Inhibition of insulin release after passive transfer of immunoglobulin from insulin-dependent diabetic children to mice

Annette Svenningsen, Thomas Dyrberg, Ivan Gerling, Åke Lernmark, Peter Mackay, Alexander Rabinovitch

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Abstract

We used the mouse passive transfer model to test whether islet cell antibodies affect β-cell function. The immunoglobulin (Ig) fraction of plasma from 5 islet cell surface antibody-positive, newly diagnosed insulin-dependent diabetic children or of a pool of plasma from 12 normal subjects was injected daily (7–16 mg IgG/day) for 14 days into normal immunosuppressed BALB/c mice. Insulin secretory responses in the Ig-injected mice were then examined by perfusing the rodent pancreata in vitro. Insulin release induced by 20 mmol/liter Dglucose during 30 min of stimulation decreased from 900 ng insulin (median; range, 814–1138) from pancreata of mice injected with control Ig to 511 ng (range, 130–786) from pancreata of mice injected with diabetic Ig (P < 0.003). Both the initial peak and the sustained second phase of glucose-stimulated insulin release were depressed in 4 of the 5 pancreata from mice injected with diabetic Ig. These results indicate that circulating antibodies in diabetic children may alter β-cell function and possibly contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin-dependent diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1301-1304
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume57
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1983

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Immunoglobulins
Insulin
Pancreas
Plasmas
Medical problems
Rodentia
Immunoglobulin G
Glucose
Antibodies
islet cell antibody

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

Cite this

Inhibition of insulin release after passive transfer of immunoglobulin from insulin-dependent diabetic children to mice. / Svenningsen, Annette; Dyrberg, Thomas; Gerling, Ivan; Lernmark, Åke; Mackay, Peter; Rabinovitch, Alexander.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 57, No. 6, 01.01.1983, p. 1301-1304.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Svenningsen, Annette ; Dyrberg, Thomas ; Gerling, Ivan ; Lernmark, Åke ; Mackay, Peter ; Rabinovitch, Alexander. / Inhibition of insulin release after passive transfer of immunoglobulin from insulin-dependent diabetic children to mice. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 1983 ; Vol. 57, No. 6. pp. 1301-1304.
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