Injuries in pediatric patients with seatbelt contusions

D. J. Campbell, Larry Richard Sprouse, Lisa A. Smith, Joseph E. Kelley, Michael G. Carr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children restrained with lap belts may sustain severe injuries. We investigated the frequency of each type of injury associated with seatbelt contusions. The medical records of all trauma patients with ICD-9 codes for abdominal wall contusions from January 1, 1999, to December 31, 2001, were reviewed. All patients with seatbelt contusions were included in the study. Age, seat position, weight, restraint-type, sex, and mechanism of injury were noted. There were 1447 admissions for trauma over the 3-year period. Forty-six patients (ages 4-13) had a seatbelt contusion. Thirty-three wore lap belts, and 13 wore lap and shoulder harnesses. Twenty-two children required abdominal exploration. Small bowel injuries were the most common intra-abdominal injuries. Facial injuries were the most common associated injuries. Forty-eight per cent of children with seatbelt contusions in our institution required surgery. The smaller patients tend to have higher frequency of abdominal injuries. The presence of seatbelt contusion indicates the possibility of severe internal injuries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1095-1099
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume69
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Contusions
Pediatrics
Wounds and Injuries
Abdominal Injuries
International Classification of Diseases
Facial Injuries
Abdominal Wall
Medical Records
Weights and Measures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Campbell, D. J., Sprouse, L. R., Smith, L. A., Kelley, J. E., & Carr, M. G. (2003). Injuries in pediatric patients with seatbelt contusions. American Surgeon, 69(12), 1095-1099.

Injuries in pediatric patients with seatbelt contusions. / Campbell, D. J.; Sprouse, Larry Richard; Smith, Lisa A.; Kelley, Joseph E.; Carr, Michael G.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 69, No. 12, 01.12.2003, p. 1095-1099.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Campbell, DJ, Sprouse, LR, Smith, LA, Kelley, JE & Carr, MG 2003, 'Injuries in pediatric patients with seatbelt contusions', American Surgeon, vol. 69, no. 12, pp. 1095-1099.
Campbell DJ, Sprouse LR, Smith LA, Kelley JE, Carr MG. Injuries in pediatric patients with seatbelt contusions. American Surgeon. 2003 Dec 1;69(12):1095-1099.
Campbell, D. J. ; Sprouse, Larry Richard ; Smith, Lisa A. ; Kelley, Joseph E. ; Carr, Michael G. / Injuries in pediatric patients with seatbelt contusions. In: American Surgeon. 2003 ; Vol. 69, No. 12. pp. 1095-1099.
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