Injury rates from walking, gardening, weightlifting, outdoor bicycling, and aerobics

Kenneth E. Powell, Gregory Heath, Marcie Jo Kresnow, Jeffrey J. Sacks, Christine M. Branche

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The objective of this survey was to estimate the frequency of injuries associated with five commonly performed moderately intense activities: walking for exercise, gardening and yard work, weightlifting, aerobic dance, and outdoor bicycling. Methods: National estimates were derived from weighted responses of over 5,000 individuals contacted between April 28 and September 18, 1994, via random-digit dialing of U.S. residential telephone numbers. Self-reported participation in these five activities in the late spring and summer of 1994 was common, ranging from an estimated 14.5 ± 1.2% of the population for aerobics (nearly 30 million people) to 73.0 ± 1.5% for walking (about 138 million people). Results: Among participants, the activity-specific 30-d prevalence of injury ranged from 0.9 ± 0.5% for outdoor bicycle riding to 2.4 ± 1.3% for weightlifting. The estimated number of people injured in the 30 d before their interview ranged from 330,000 for outdoor bicycle riding to 2.1 million for gardening or yard work. Incidence rates for injuries causing reduced participation in activity were 1.1 ± 0.5- 100 participants · 30 d for walking, 1.1 ± 0.4 for gardening, and 3.3 ± 1.9 for weightlifting. During walking and gardening, men and women were equally likely to be injured, but younger people (18-44 yr) were more likely to be injured than older people (45 + yr). Injury rates were low, yet large numbers of people were injured because participation rates were high. Most injuries were minor, but injuries may reduce participation in these otherwise beneficial activities. Conclusions: Additional studies to confirm the magnitude of the problem, to identify modifiable risk factors, and to recommend methods to reduce the frequency of such injuries are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1246-1249
Number of pages4
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume30
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Bicycling
Gardening
Walking
Wounds and Injuries
Dancing
Telephone
Interviews
Exercise
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Injury rates from walking, gardening, weightlifting, outdoor bicycling, and aerobics. / Powell, Kenneth E.; Heath, Gregory; Kresnow, Marcie Jo; Sacks, Jeffrey J.; Branche, Christine M.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 30, No. 8, 01.08.1998, p. 1246-1249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Powell, Kenneth E. ; Heath, Gregory ; Kresnow, Marcie Jo ; Sacks, Jeffrey J. ; Branche, Christine M. / Injury rates from walking, gardening, weightlifting, outdoor bicycling, and aerobics. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 1998 ; Vol. 30, No. 8. pp. 1246-1249.
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