Injury to the popliteal artery

Timothy Fabian, Margaret L. Turkleson, Timothy L. Connelly, H. Harlan Stone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During a 32 year period, 164 patients with 165 popliteal artery injuries were treated. One hundred twenty-five injuries were due to penetrating trauma, and 40 to blunt force. During the first decade reviewed, with ligation the main method of management, the amputation rate was 74 percent. Almost routine attempts at vascular repair over the ensuing 10 years reduced the amputation rate to 28 percent. During the final 12 years, six amputations were required for 81 injuries, thereby producing an amputation rate of only 6 percent. From this experience, the following principles of management have evolved: (1) early diagnosis is best accomplished by a careful history and detailed physical examination, not by arteriography; (2) thrombectomy followed by distal heparinization before repair is the best method for guaranteeing an adequate arterial outflow tract and thus successful revascularization; (3) resection of all injured vessels with reconstitution of continuity by the use of an interposed saphenous vein graft is often warranted to avoid tension; (4) popliteal vein repair should be performed when practical; and (5) subperiosteal fibulectomy-fasciotomy should be done routinely immediately after vascular repair.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-228
Number of pages4
JournalThe American Journal of Surgery
Volume143
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1982

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Popliteal Artery
Amputation
Wounds and Injuries
Blood Vessels
Popliteal Vein
Thrombectomy
Saphenous Vein
Physical Examination
Ligation
Early Diagnosis
Angiography
History
Transplants

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Fabian, T., Turkleson, M. L., Connelly, T. L., & Stone, H. H. (1982). Injury to the popliteal artery. The American Journal of Surgery, 143(2), 225-228. https://doi.org/10.1016/0002-9610(82)90074-5

Injury to the popliteal artery. / Fabian, Timothy; Turkleson, Margaret L.; Connelly, Timothy L.; Stone, H. Harlan.

In: The American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 143, No. 2, 01.01.1982, p. 225-228.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fabian, T, Turkleson, ML, Connelly, TL & Stone, HH 1982, 'Injury to the popliteal artery', The American Journal of Surgery, vol. 143, no. 2, pp. 225-228. https://doi.org/10.1016/0002-9610(82)90074-5
Fabian T, Turkleson ML, Connelly TL, Stone HH. Injury to the popliteal artery. The American Journal of Surgery. 1982 Jan 1;143(2):225-228. https://doi.org/10.1016/0002-9610(82)90074-5
Fabian, Timothy ; Turkleson, Margaret L. ; Connelly, Timothy L. ; Stone, H. Harlan. / Injury to the popliteal artery. In: The American Journal of Surgery. 1982 ; Vol. 143, No. 2. pp. 225-228.
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