Innate immune recognition of hepatitis C virus

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Infection by HCV elicits a relative strong innate immune response in the liver that is characterized by induction of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and inflammatory cytokines. Mysteriously, this intrinsic host defense response is not followed by effective HCV-specific T cell responses in a majority of infected individuals, which progress to persistent infection. Innate immune recognition of HCV is initiated by hepatocytes and other parenchymal and non-parenchymal liver cells as well as specific immune cell subsets infiltrating the liver, signaling through various intracellular pathways that culminate in induction of interferons, ISGs and cytokines. These provide the first line of defense against HCV and also orchestrate the development of subsequent adaptive immunity to the virus. Data suggest that host genetic polymorphisms and immune evasion by HCV alter the status and magnitude of intrahepatic innate immune responses, and in so doing impact the infection outcome. This chapter summarizes recent advances in innate immune responses to HCV, focusing on the mechanisms by which the host detects HCV infection and initiates antiviral and inflammatory responses and by which HCV circumvents and sometimes exploits aspects of these intrinsic immune responses for maximal survival. Also reviewed are host innate immune factors that regulate spontaneous HCV clearance and response to the interferon-based therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHepatitis C Virus I
Subtitle of host publicationCellular and Molecular Virology
PublisherSpringer Japan
Pages299-329
Number of pages31
ISBN (Electronic)9784431560982
ISBN (Print)9784431560968
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

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Hepacivirus
Interferons
Innate Immunity
Infection
Liver
Cytokines
Immune Evasion
Immunologic Factors
Adaptive Immunity
Genetic Polymorphisms
Genes
Antiviral Agents
Hepatocytes
Viruses
T-Lymphocytes
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Li, K. (2016). Innate immune recognition of hepatitis C virus. In Hepatitis C Virus I: Cellular and Molecular Virology (pp. 299-329). Springer Japan. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-4-431-56098-2_13

Innate immune recognition of hepatitis C virus. / Li, Kui.

Hepatitis C Virus I: Cellular and Molecular Virology. Springer Japan, 2016. p. 299-329.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Li, K 2016, Innate immune recognition of hepatitis C virus. in Hepatitis C Virus I: Cellular and Molecular Virology. Springer Japan, pp. 299-329. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-4-431-56098-2_13
Li K. Innate immune recognition of hepatitis C virus. In Hepatitis C Virus I: Cellular and Molecular Virology. Springer Japan. 2016. p. 299-329 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-4-431-56098-2_13
Li, Kui. / Innate immune recognition of hepatitis C virus. Hepatitis C Virus I: Cellular and Molecular Virology. Springer Japan, 2016. pp. 299-329
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