Insights into the interaction between influenza virus and pneumococcus

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

501 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bacterial infections following influenza are an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Based on the historical importance of pneumonia as a cause of death during pandemic influenza, the increasingly likely possibility that highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses will trigger the next worldwide pandemic underscores the need to understand the multiple mechanisms underlying the interaction between influenza virus and bacterial pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. There is ample evidence to support the historical view that influenza virus alters the lungs in a way that predisposes to adherence, invasion, and induction of disease by pneumococcus. Access to receptors is a key factor and may be facilitated by the virus through epithelial damage, by exposure or up-regulation of receptors, or by provoking the epithelial regeneration response to cytotoxic damage. More recent data indicate that alteration of the immune response by diminishing the ability of the host to clear pneumococcus or by amplification of the inflammatory cascade is another key factor. Identification and exploration of the underlying mechanisms responsible for this synergism will provide targets for prevention and treatment using drugs and vaccines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)571-582
Number of pages12
JournalClinical Microbiology Reviews
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2006

Fingerprint

Streptococcus pneumoniae
Orthomyxoviridae
Pandemics
Human Influenza
Influenza in Birds
Bacterial Infections
Regeneration
Cause of Death
Pneumonia
Up-Regulation
Vaccines
Viruses
Morbidity
Lung
Mortality
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Insights into the interaction between influenza virus and pneumococcus. / Mccullers, Jonathan.

In: Clinical Microbiology Reviews, Vol. 19, No. 3, 01.07.2006, p. 571-582.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{7a79521c3c5044828caf2858bc463fd5,
title = "Insights into the interaction between influenza virus and pneumococcus",
abstract = "Bacterial infections following influenza are an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Based on the historical importance of pneumonia as a cause of death during pandemic influenza, the increasingly likely possibility that highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses will trigger the next worldwide pandemic underscores the need to understand the multiple mechanisms underlying the interaction between influenza virus and bacterial pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. There is ample evidence to support the historical view that influenza virus alters the lungs in a way that predisposes to adherence, invasion, and induction of disease by pneumococcus. Access to receptors is a key factor and may be facilitated by the virus through epithelial damage, by exposure or up-regulation of receptors, or by provoking the epithelial regeneration response to cytotoxic damage. More recent data indicate that alteration of the immune response by diminishing the ability of the host to clear pneumococcus or by amplification of the inflammatory cascade is another key factor. Identification and exploration of the underlying mechanisms responsible for this synergism will provide targets for prevention and treatment using drugs and vaccines.",
author = "Jonathan Mccullers",
year = "2006",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1128/CMR.00058-05",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
pages = "571--582",
journal = "Clinical Microbiology Reviews",
issn = "0893-8512",
publisher = "American Society for Microbiology",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Insights into the interaction between influenza virus and pneumococcus

AU - Mccullers, Jonathan

PY - 2006/7/1

Y1 - 2006/7/1

N2 - Bacterial infections following influenza are an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Based on the historical importance of pneumonia as a cause of death during pandemic influenza, the increasingly likely possibility that highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses will trigger the next worldwide pandemic underscores the need to understand the multiple mechanisms underlying the interaction between influenza virus and bacterial pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. There is ample evidence to support the historical view that influenza virus alters the lungs in a way that predisposes to adherence, invasion, and induction of disease by pneumococcus. Access to receptors is a key factor and may be facilitated by the virus through epithelial damage, by exposure or up-regulation of receptors, or by provoking the epithelial regeneration response to cytotoxic damage. More recent data indicate that alteration of the immune response by diminishing the ability of the host to clear pneumococcus or by amplification of the inflammatory cascade is another key factor. Identification and exploration of the underlying mechanisms responsible for this synergism will provide targets for prevention and treatment using drugs and vaccines.

AB - Bacterial infections following influenza are an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Based on the historical importance of pneumonia as a cause of death during pandemic influenza, the increasingly likely possibility that highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses will trigger the next worldwide pandemic underscores the need to understand the multiple mechanisms underlying the interaction between influenza virus and bacterial pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. There is ample evidence to support the historical view that influenza virus alters the lungs in a way that predisposes to adherence, invasion, and induction of disease by pneumococcus. Access to receptors is a key factor and may be facilitated by the virus through epithelial damage, by exposure or up-regulation of receptors, or by provoking the epithelial regeneration response to cytotoxic damage. More recent data indicate that alteration of the immune response by diminishing the ability of the host to clear pneumococcus or by amplification of the inflammatory cascade is another key factor. Identification and exploration of the underlying mechanisms responsible for this synergism will provide targets for prevention and treatment using drugs and vaccines.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33746483285&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33746483285&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1128/CMR.00058-05

DO - 10.1128/CMR.00058-05

M3 - Review article

VL - 19

SP - 571

EP - 582

JO - Clinical Microbiology Reviews

JF - Clinical Microbiology Reviews

SN - 0893-8512

IS - 3

ER -