Insulin resistance and hypertension

Sudha S. Shankar, Helmut Steinberg

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

IR has been reported to be associated with elevated blood pressure and hypertension. It is reasonable to postulate that IR is causally related to increased rates of hypertension in IR, especially considering abnormalities in SNS activity, renal salt handling, and endothelial function. Other, albeit indirect, evidence for the causal role of IR in blood pressure elevation comes from studies where improvement in IR resulted in lowering of blood pressure. A likely mechanistic explanation for the association between IR and blood pressure is that adipocyte dysfunction, elevated free fatty acid levels and elevated insulin levels, over time, may adversely affect systems involved in blood pressure regulation. Since the association between IR and elevated blood pressure is not found in all populations, these studies also suggest that, depending on genetic and environmental factors, these IR-induced changes lead eventually to increased blood pressure, or diabetes, or cardiovascular disease, or any combination of these. Of these, the time-dependent effects on blood pressure, even if not detectable in all individuals as a measurable change, may be particularly signifi cant from a population perspective. Importantly, improvement in IR will likely have signifi cant overall benefi cial effects, to prevent or postpone the development of diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEndocrine Hypertension
Subtitle of host publicationUnderlying Mechanisms and Therapy
PublisherHumana Press Inc.
Pages239-250
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9781607615484
ISBN (Print)9781607615477
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Insulin Resistance
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Cardiovascular Diseases
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Adipocytes
Population
Salts
Insulin
Kidney

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Shankar, S. S., & Steinberg, H. (2013). Insulin resistance and hypertension. In Endocrine Hypertension: Underlying Mechanisms and Therapy (pp. 239-250). Humana Press Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-60761-548-4_12

Insulin resistance and hypertension. / Shankar, Sudha S.; Steinberg, Helmut.

Endocrine Hypertension: Underlying Mechanisms and Therapy. Humana Press Inc., 2013. p. 239-250.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Shankar, SS & Steinberg, H 2013, Insulin resistance and hypertension. in Endocrine Hypertension: Underlying Mechanisms and Therapy. Humana Press Inc., pp. 239-250. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-60761-548-4_12
Shankar SS, Steinberg H. Insulin resistance and hypertension. In Endocrine Hypertension: Underlying Mechanisms and Therapy. Humana Press Inc. 2013. p. 239-250 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-60761-548-4_12
Shankar, Sudha S. ; Steinberg, Helmut. / Insulin resistance and hypertension. Endocrine Hypertension: Underlying Mechanisms and Therapy. Humana Press Inc., 2013. pp. 239-250
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