Interaction of a 60-kilodalton D-mannose-containing salivary glycoprotein with type 1 fimbriae of Escherichia coli

Jegdish Babu, S. N. Abraham, M. K. Dabbous, E. H. Beachey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A 60-kilodalton glycoprotein previously isolated and purified from human saliva (J.P. Babu, E.H. Beachey, D.L. Hasty, and W.A. Simpson, Infect. Immun. 51:405-413, 1986) was found to interact with type 1 fimbriae and prevent adhesion of type 1 fimbriated Escherichia coli to animal cells in a D-mannose-sensitive manner. Purified salivary glycoprotein agglutinated type 1 fimbriated E. coli and, at subagglutinating concentrations, blocked the ability of type 1 fimbriated E. coli to attach to human buccal epithelial cells or agglutinate guinea pig erythrocytes. Both interactions were inhibited by α-methyl-D-mannoside but not by α-methyl-D-glucoside. Complexing of the glycoprotein to type 1 fimbriae was demonstrated by molecular sieve chromatography and modified Western blots. When mixed with type 1 fimbriae, the radiolabeled salivary glycoprotein coeluted with type 1 fimbriae from a column of Sepharose 4B. When blotted from a sodium dodecyl sulfate gel to nitrocellulose sheets, the glycoprotein interacted directly with type 1 fimbriae applied to the blots. Both of the latter interactions also were blocked by α-methyl-D-mannoside but not by α-methyl-D-glucoside. Chemical modification of the glycoprotein with sodium metaperiodate abolished its ability to interact with isolated type 1 fimbriae or type 1 fimbriated E. coli. These results suggest that the carbohydrate moiety of the 60-kilodalton glycoprotein serves as a receptor for type 1 fimbriae in the oral cavity, and we postulate that the interaction may cause agglutination and early removal of E. coli, thereby preventing colonization by these organisms of oropharyngeal mucosae and dental tissues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-108
Number of pages5
JournalInfection and Immunity
Volume54
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mannose
Glycoproteins
Escherichia coli
Collodion
Cheek
Agglutination
Saliva
Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate
Sepharose
Gel Chromatography
Mouth
Tooth
Guinea Pigs
Mucous Membrane
Erythrocytes
Western Blotting
Gels
Epithelial Cells
Carbohydrates

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Parasitology
  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Interaction of a 60-kilodalton D-mannose-containing salivary glycoprotein with type 1 fimbriae of Escherichia coli. / Babu, Jegdish; Abraham, S. N.; Dabbous, M. K.; Beachey, E. H.

In: Infection and Immunity, Vol. 54, No. 1, 01.01.1986, p. 104-108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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