Interactions between insulin and norepinephrine on blood pressure and insulin sensitivity

Studies in lean and obese men

A. D. Baron, G. Brechtel, A. Johnson, N. Fineberg, D. P. Henry, Helmut Steinberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

To explore the interactions between insulin action and norepinephrine (NE) on blood pressure and muscle vascular resistance, we studied seven lean (66±1 kg) sensitive and seven age-matched obese (96±3 kg) insulin-resistant men after an overnight fast. Both groups were normotensive; however, the obese exhibited higher basal blood pressure, 90.8±2.2 vs. 83.4±1.6 mmHg, P < 0.04. Each subject was studied on two separate days during either saline (S) infusion or a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp (I) achieving insulin concentrations of ~70 μU/ml. After 180 min of either S or I, NE was infused systemically at rates of ~50, 75, and 100 pg/kg per min. Glucose uptake was measured in whole body ([3-3H]glucose) and in leg by the balance technique. The results indicate: (a) the NE/pressor dose-response curve was decreased (shifted to the right) during I in lean but not in obese subjects, (b) I enhanced NE metabolic clearance by 20% in lean but not in obese, (c) NE decreases leg vascular resistance more in lean than in obese, and (d) NE causes a ~20% increase in insulin-mediated glucose uptake in both groups. In conclusion, insulin resistance of obesity is associated with an apparent augmented NE pressor sensitivity and decreased NE metabolic clearance. Both of these mechanisms can potentially contribute to the higher incidence of hypertension in obese man. Insulin resistance is likely to be a predisposing but not sufficient factor in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Because the obese group exhibited higher basal blood pressure, it is possible that our results reflect this difference. Further studies will be required to clarify this issue.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2453-2462
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Clinical Investigation
Volume93
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

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Insulin Resistance
Norepinephrine
Insulin
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Glucose
Vascular Resistance
Leg
Glucose Clamp Technique
Obesity
Muscles
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Interactions between insulin and norepinephrine on blood pressure and insulin sensitivity : Studies in lean and obese men. / Baron, A. D.; Brechtel, G.; Johnson, A.; Fineberg, N.; Henry, D. P.; Steinberg, Helmut.

In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, Vol. 93, No. 6, 01.01.1994, p. 2453-2462.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baron, A. D. ; Brechtel, G. ; Johnson, A. ; Fineberg, N. ; Henry, D. P. ; Steinberg, Helmut. / Interactions between insulin and norepinephrine on blood pressure and insulin sensitivity : Studies in lean and obese men. In: Journal of Clinical Investigation. 1994 ; Vol. 93, No. 6. pp. 2453-2462.
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