Interactions of immunoliposomes with target cells

A. Huang, Stephen Kennel, L. Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

126 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have covalently attached a monoclonal antibody (11-4.1) against the murine major histocompatibility antigen, H-2K(k), on the surface of liposomes. The interaction of these antibody-coated liposomes (immunoliposomes) with target cells, RDM-4 lymphoma (H-2K(k)), was investigated. About 90% of the immunoliposomes taken up by target cells at 4°C could be removed by a mild protease treatment of the cells, whereas only 30% of the uptake at 37°C was labile to the same treatment. Furthermore, the uptake of immunoliposomes at 37° C was inhibitable by cytochalasin B or by a combination of 2-deoxyglucose and NaN 3 . These results suggest that immunoliposome binding to the target cell surface is the primary uptake event at 4°C and that the surface-bound liposomes are rapidly internalized by the cells at 37°C, probably via an endocytic pathway. Studies with fluorescence microscopy of target cells treated with immunoliposomes containing carboxyfluorescein also supported this conclusion. If endocytosis is the mechanism by which immunoliposomes gain entry into target cells, the efficacy of a cytotoxic drug encapsulated would depend on the resistance of the drug to lysosomal inactivation and its ability to escape from the lysosomal system. Consistent with this notion, we observed that methotrexate encapsulated in liposomes bearing 11-4.1 antibody specifically inhibited deoxy[6- 3 H]uridine incorporation into DNA in target RDM-4 cells but not in P3-X63-Ag8 myeloma cells (H-2K(d)) at the same doses. The observed cytotoxic effect of encapsulated methotrexate could be reversed by the treatment of cells with a lysosotropic amine, chloroquine, which has been shown to increase the intralysosomal pH of mammalian cells. On the other hand, cytosine-β-D-arabinofuranoside encapsulated in immunoliposomes showed no target-specific killing, probably because the drug is readily inactivated in the lysosomal system. These results are discussed in terms of the drug carrier potential of immunoliposomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14034-14040
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume258
Issue number22
StatePublished - Dec 1 1983
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Liposomes
Cells
Methotrexate
Bearings (structural)
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Cytochalasin B
Drug Carriers
Histocompatibility Antigens
Antibodies
Uridine
Fluorescence microscopy
Cytosine
Deoxyglucose
Chloroquine
Amines
Peptide Hydrolases
Monoclonal Antibodies
DNA
Endocytosis
Fluorescence Microscopy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Interactions of immunoliposomes with target cells. / Huang, A.; Kennel, Stephen; Huang, L.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 258, No. 22, 01.12.1983, p. 14034-14040.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Huang, A, Kennel, S & Huang, L 1983, 'Interactions of immunoliposomes with target cells', Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 258, no. 22, pp. 14034-14040.
Huang, A. ; Kennel, Stephen ; Huang, L. / Interactions of immunoliposomes with target cells. In: Journal of Biological Chemistry. 1983 ; Vol. 258, No. 22. pp. 14034-14040.
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