Interval mammography after needle localization biopsy of breast abnormalities that are pathologically benign

John L. Gwin, Bernadette King, Kathleen B. Hudson, John Bell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Needle localization biopsy is commonly performed for the diagnosis of mammographic abnormalities. Routine specimen radiography is generally recommended, but the value of routine short-interval postbiopsy mammography has not been analyzed. Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective review of 299 consecutive localized biopsies in 286 women from March 1989 to November 1993. Of these biopsies, 217 form the basis for this study; all yielded a benign pathologic diagnosis and had both specimen radiography and 3-month interval mammograms performed. Results: A total of 192 (88%) of postbiopsy mammograms were interpreted as negative, while 22 (10%) were suspicious. Three patients had second biopsies and all had benign diagnoses, 16 had follow-up mammograms that were interpreted as normal or stable, and 3 patients were lost to follow-up. A suspicious postbiopsy mammogram had no significant relationship to initial mammographic abnormality or pathologic diagnosis, but did correlate with specimen radiograph interpretation (P = 0.02 by chi-square comparison). Conclusions: In a series of needle localization biopsies with intraoperative specimen radiography, postbiopsy mammography failed to reveal any missed cancers. Short-interval follow-up mammography is unnecessary to assess for residual abnormalities when specimen radiography confirms excision of the abnormality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)323-326
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume170
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Needle Biopsy
Mammography
Radiography
Breast
Biopsy
Lost to Follow-Up
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Interval mammography after needle localization biopsy of breast abnormalities that are pathologically benign. / Gwin, John L.; King, Bernadette; Hudson, Kathleen B.; Bell, John.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 170, No. 4, 1995, p. 323-326.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gwin, John L. ; King, Bernadette ; Hudson, Kathleen B. ; Bell, John. / Interval mammography after needle localization biopsy of breast abnormalities that are pathologically benign. In: American Journal of Surgery. 1995 ; Vol. 170, No. 4. pp. 323-326.
@article{ab97011c82cc4d3bb4272071c5ec0a64,
title = "Interval mammography after needle localization biopsy of breast abnormalities that are pathologically benign",
abstract = "Background: Needle localization biopsy is commonly performed for the diagnosis of mammographic abnormalities. Routine specimen radiography is generally recommended, but the value of routine short-interval postbiopsy mammography has not been analyzed. Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective review of 299 consecutive localized biopsies in 286 women from March 1989 to November 1993. Of these biopsies, 217 form the basis for this study; all yielded a benign pathologic diagnosis and had both specimen radiography and 3-month interval mammograms performed. Results: A total of 192 (88{\%}) of postbiopsy mammograms were interpreted as negative, while 22 (10{\%}) were suspicious. Three patients had second biopsies and all had benign diagnoses, 16 had follow-up mammograms that were interpreted as normal or stable, and 3 patients were lost to follow-up. A suspicious postbiopsy mammogram had no significant relationship to initial mammographic abnormality or pathologic diagnosis, but did correlate with specimen radiograph interpretation (P = 0.02 by chi-square comparison). Conclusions: In a series of needle localization biopsies with intraoperative specimen radiography, postbiopsy mammography failed to reveal any missed cancers. Short-interval follow-up mammography is unnecessary to assess for residual abnormalities when specimen radiography confirms excision of the abnormality.",
author = "Gwin, {John L.} and Bernadette King and Hudson, {Kathleen B.} and John Bell",
year = "1995",
doi = "10.1016/S0002-9610(99)80297-9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "170",
pages = "323--326",
journal = "American Journal of Surgery",
issn = "0002-9610",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Interval mammography after needle localization biopsy of breast abnormalities that are pathologically benign

AU - Gwin, John L.

AU - King, Bernadette

AU - Hudson, Kathleen B.

AU - Bell, John

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - Background: Needle localization biopsy is commonly performed for the diagnosis of mammographic abnormalities. Routine specimen radiography is generally recommended, but the value of routine short-interval postbiopsy mammography has not been analyzed. Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective review of 299 consecutive localized biopsies in 286 women from March 1989 to November 1993. Of these biopsies, 217 form the basis for this study; all yielded a benign pathologic diagnosis and had both specimen radiography and 3-month interval mammograms performed. Results: A total of 192 (88%) of postbiopsy mammograms were interpreted as negative, while 22 (10%) were suspicious. Three patients had second biopsies and all had benign diagnoses, 16 had follow-up mammograms that were interpreted as normal or stable, and 3 patients were lost to follow-up. A suspicious postbiopsy mammogram had no significant relationship to initial mammographic abnormality or pathologic diagnosis, but did correlate with specimen radiograph interpretation (P = 0.02 by chi-square comparison). Conclusions: In a series of needle localization biopsies with intraoperative specimen radiography, postbiopsy mammography failed to reveal any missed cancers. Short-interval follow-up mammography is unnecessary to assess for residual abnormalities when specimen radiography confirms excision of the abnormality.

AB - Background: Needle localization biopsy is commonly performed for the diagnosis of mammographic abnormalities. Routine specimen radiography is generally recommended, but the value of routine short-interval postbiopsy mammography has not been analyzed. Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective review of 299 consecutive localized biopsies in 286 women from March 1989 to November 1993. Of these biopsies, 217 form the basis for this study; all yielded a benign pathologic diagnosis and had both specimen radiography and 3-month interval mammograms performed. Results: A total of 192 (88%) of postbiopsy mammograms were interpreted as negative, while 22 (10%) were suspicious. Three patients had second biopsies and all had benign diagnoses, 16 had follow-up mammograms that were interpreted as normal or stable, and 3 patients were lost to follow-up. A suspicious postbiopsy mammogram had no significant relationship to initial mammographic abnormality or pathologic diagnosis, but did correlate with specimen radiograph interpretation (P = 0.02 by chi-square comparison). Conclusions: In a series of needle localization biopsies with intraoperative specimen radiography, postbiopsy mammography failed to reveal any missed cancers. Short-interval follow-up mammography is unnecessary to assess for residual abnormalities when specimen radiography confirms excision of the abnormality.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029093509&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029093509&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0002-9610(99)80297-9

DO - 10.1016/S0002-9610(99)80297-9

M3 - Article

VL - 170

SP - 323

EP - 326

JO - American Journal of Surgery

JF - American Journal of Surgery

SN - 0002-9610

IS - 4

ER -