Intestinal transport of monosaccharides and amino acids during postnatal development of mink

Randal Buddington, Christiane Malo, Per T. Sangild, Elnif Jan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intestinal development is typically studied using omnivores. For comparative purposes, we examined an altricial carnivore, the mink (Mustela vison). In mink, intestinal dimensions increase up to 8 wk after birth and then remain constant (length) or decrease (mass) into maturity despite continuing gains in body mass. Rates of glucose and fructose transport decline after birth for intact tissues but increase for brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV). Rates of absorption for five amino acids that are substrates for the acidic (aspartate), basic (lysine), neutral (leucine and methionine), and imino acid (proline) carriers increase between birth and 24 h for intact tissues before declining, but increase after 2 wk for BBMV. The proportion of BBMV amino acid uptake that is Na+-dependent increases during development but for aspartate is nearly 100% at all ages. Tracer uptake by BBMV can be inhibited by 100 mmol/l of unlabeled amino acid, except for lysine. BBMV uptake of the dipeptide glycyl-sarcosine does not differ between ages, is not Na+ dependent, and is only partially inhibited by 100 mmol/l unlabeled dipeptide. Despite the ability to rapidly and efficiently digest high dietary loads of protein, rates of amino acid and peptide absorption are not markedly higher than those of other mammals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume279
Issue number6 48-6
StatePublished - Dec 30 2000

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Mink
Monosaccharides
Microvilli
Amino Acids
Membranes
Dipeptides
Parturition
Aspartic Acid
Lysine
Imino Acids
Sarcosine
Acidic Amino Acids
Dietary Proteins
Fructose
Leucine
Methionine
Mammals
Glucose
Peptides

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Intestinal transport of monosaccharides and amino acids during postnatal development of mink. / Buddington, Randal; Malo, Christiane; Sangild, Per T.; Jan, Elnif.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, Vol. 279, No. 6 48-6, 30.12.2000.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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