Investigating the prognostic value of KOC (K homology domain containing protein overexpressed in cancer) overexpression after curative intent resection of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

Benny Johnson, Maged Khalil, Joseph Blansfield, Fan Lin, Shaobo Zhu, H. Lester Kirchner, Alva Weir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is now the third leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States. More than 80% of patients present with distant metastasis precluding surgical eligibility. Even among patients with localized disease deemed eligible for surgical resection, the median survival is only 22.8 months due to high recurrence rates. Identification of a biomarker correlated with patient specific prognosis upon initial diagnosis can serve as a way to individualize treatment options. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study analyzing pathology of patients who underwent curative intent surgery for PDAC at Geisinger Medical Center from 1998-2011 to identify whether the expression of KOC can be predictive of patient specific prognosis. Tissue microarrays of specimens were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: A total of 62 patients are included. Comparisons between groups on overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) are estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. Each biomarker was represented as low and high expression by categorizing the expression score at <4+ or >4+, based on intensity and extent of cells stained. 40 deaths occurred in the sample. Distant metastasis and differentiation (well/moderate vs. poor) were related to OS (P=0.0120, P=0.0086). Twenty-nine patients progressed in their disease. High/low KOC expression were significantly related to PFS (P=0.0556). Patients with a high KOC expression were more than 2 times more likely to progress compared to those with a low KOC expression (HR =2.04; 95% CI: 0.97, 4.29). Conclusions: Our data is suggestive of KOC being a useful prognostic biomarker for identifying those patients with PDAC who have a high risk for early progression and distant metastasis. Larger studies are needed to determine whether KOC can be a therapeutic target in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, considering high KOC expressers had a worse PFS than their counterparts, investigation regarding the use of KOC expression as a biomarker to preselect patients who may benefit most from neoadjuvant chemotherapy is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E113-E117
JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Oncology
Volume7
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Adenocarcinoma
Neoplasms
Biomarkers
Disease-Free Survival
Neoplasm Metastasis
Survival
Protein Domains
Pancreatic Neoplasms
Cohort Studies
Therapeutics
Retrospective Studies
Immunohistochemistry
Pathology
Recurrence
Drug Therapy
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Investigating the prognostic value of KOC (K homology domain containing protein overexpressed in cancer) overexpression after curative intent resection of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. / Johnson, Benny; Khalil, Maged; Blansfield, Joseph; Lin, Fan; Zhu, Shaobo; Lester Kirchner, H.; Weir, Alva.

In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology, Vol. 7, No. 6, 01.01.2016, p. E113-E117.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{206b7c05047d4cf985b8d1b7d5b0677a,
title = "Investigating the prognostic value of KOC (K homology domain containing protein overexpressed in cancer) overexpression after curative intent resection of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma",
abstract = "Background: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is now the third leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States. More than 80{\%} of patients present with distant metastasis precluding surgical eligibility. Even among patients with localized disease deemed eligible for surgical resection, the median survival is only 22.8 months due to high recurrence rates. Identification of a biomarker correlated with patient specific prognosis upon initial diagnosis can serve as a way to individualize treatment options. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study analyzing pathology of patients who underwent curative intent surgery for PDAC at Geisinger Medical Center from 1998-2011 to identify whether the expression of KOC can be predictive of patient specific prognosis. Tissue microarrays of specimens were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: A total of 62 patients are included. Comparisons between groups on overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) are estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. Each biomarker was represented as low and high expression by categorizing the expression score at <4+ or >4+, based on intensity and extent of cells stained. 40 deaths occurred in the sample. Distant metastasis and differentiation (well/moderate vs. poor) were related to OS (P=0.0120, P=0.0086). Twenty-nine patients progressed in their disease. High/low KOC expression were significantly related to PFS (P=0.0556). Patients with a high KOC expression were more than 2 times more likely to progress compared to those with a low KOC expression (HR =2.04; 95{\%} CI: 0.97, 4.29). Conclusions: Our data is suggestive of KOC being a useful prognostic biomarker for identifying those patients with PDAC who have a high risk for early progression and distant metastasis. Larger studies are needed to determine whether KOC can be a therapeutic target in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, considering high KOC expressers had a worse PFS than their counterparts, investigation regarding the use of KOC expression as a biomarker to preselect patients who may benefit most from neoadjuvant chemotherapy is warranted.",
author = "Benny Johnson and Maged Khalil and Joseph Blansfield and Fan Lin and Shaobo Zhu and {Lester Kirchner}, H. and Alva Weir",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.21037/jgo.2016.11.05",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
pages = "E113--E117",
journal = "Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology",
issn = "2078-6891",
publisher = "Pioneer Bioscience Publishing Company (PBPC)",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Investigating the prognostic value of KOC (K homology domain containing protein overexpressed in cancer) overexpression after curative intent resection of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

AU - Johnson, Benny

AU - Khalil, Maged

AU - Blansfield, Joseph

AU - Lin, Fan

AU - Zhu, Shaobo

AU - Lester Kirchner, H.

AU - Weir, Alva

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - Background: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is now the third leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States. More than 80% of patients present with distant metastasis precluding surgical eligibility. Even among patients with localized disease deemed eligible for surgical resection, the median survival is only 22.8 months due to high recurrence rates. Identification of a biomarker correlated with patient specific prognosis upon initial diagnosis can serve as a way to individualize treatment options. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study analyzing pathology of patients who underwent curative intent surgery for PDAC at Geisinger Medical Center from 1998-2011 to identify whether the expression of KOC can be predictive of patient specific prognosis. Tissue microarrays of specimens were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: A total of 62 patients are included. Comparisons between groups on overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) are estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. Each biomarker was represented as low and high expression by categorizing the expression score at <4+ or >4+, based on intensity and extent of cells stained. 40 deaths occurred in the sample. Distant metastasis and differentiation (well/moderate vs. poor) were related to OS (P=0.0120, P=0.0086). Twenty-nine patients progressed in their disease. High/low KOC expression were significantly related to PFS (P=0.0556). Patients with a high KOC expression were more than 2 times more likely to progress compared to those with a low KOC expression (HR =2.04; 95% CI: 0.97, 4.29). Conclusions: Our data is suggestive of KOC being a useful prognostic biomarker for identifying those patients with PDAC who have a high risk for early progression and distant metastasis. Larger studies are needed to determine whether KOC can be a therapeutic target in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, considering high KOC expressers had a worse PFS than their counterparts, investigation regarding the use of KOC expression as a biomarker to preselect patients who may benefit most from neoadjuvant chemotherapy is warranted.

AB - Background: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is now the third leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States. More than 80% of patients present with distant metastasis precluding surgical eligibility. Even among patients with localized disease deemed eligible for surgical resection, the median survival is only 22.8 months due to high recurrence rates. Identification of a biomarker correlated with patient specific prognosis upon initial diagnosis can serve as a way to individualize treatment options. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study analyzing pathology of patients who underwent curative intent surgery for PDAC at Geisinger Medical Center from 1998-2011 to identify whether the expression of KOC can be predictive of patient specific prognosis. Tissue microarrays of specimens were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: A total of 62 patients are included. Comparisons between groups on overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) are estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. Each biomarker was represented as low and high expression by categorizing the expression score at <4+ or >4+, based on intensity and extent of cells stained. 40 deaths occurred in the sample. Distant metastasis and differentiation (well/moderate vs. poor) were related to OS (P=0.0120, P=0.0086). Twenty-nine patients progressed in their disease. High/low KOC expression were significantly related to PFS (P=0.0556). Patients with a high KOC expression were more than 2 times more likely to progress compared to those with a low KOC expression (HR =2.04; 95% CI: 0.97, 4.29). Conclusions: Our data is suggestive of KOC being a useful prognostic biomarker for identifying those patients with PDAC who have a high risk for early progression and distant metastasis. Larger studies are needed to determine whether KOC can be a therapeutic target in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, considering high KOC expressers had a worse PFS than their counterparts, investigation regarding the use of KOC expression as a biomarker to preselect patients who may benefit most from neoadjuvant chemotherapy is warranted.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85007017034&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85007017034&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.21037/jgo.2016.11.05

DO - 10.21037/jgo.2016.11.05

M3 - Article

VL - 7

SP - E113-E117

JO - Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology

JF - Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology

SN - 2078-6891

IS - 6

ER -