Irreversible agonist and antagonist properties of isothiocyanatobenzyl imidazoline in albino rabbit iris muscles

Hitoshi Ishikawa, Duane Miller, Popat N. Patil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The alkylating agent isothiocyanatobenzyl imidazoline (IBI) was synthesized to investigate the unique receptor interacting properties of imidazolines. On the isolated rabbit iris sphincter, IBI produced concentration-dependent responses with an EC50 of 18 μmol/l, and at the highest concentration tested the maximum contraction of the tissue was 50% of the carbachol maximum. At equiactive concentrations with the similar washing procedure, the total duration of responses to IBI and carbachol was 24 and 3 min, respectively. After repeated washing, the sphincter relaxes to the control baseline of tone but, after reexposure to IBI for 6 h, failed to contract, indicating that desensitization or irreversible-block has developed. Unlike with carbachol, the sphincter contraction to IBI was not affected by atropine 1 μmol/l, indomethacin 1 μmol/l, verapamil 10 μmol/l, or nifedipine 10 μmol/l. At a higher concentration of nifedipine and papaverine 100 μmol/l, the response to IBI was blocked. Furthermore, the contractile response to IBI was abolished by Ca++ removal from the medium. Under similar conditions, 26 ± 8% of the maximum response to carbachol was preserved. Thus influx of extracellular as well as rise in intracellular Ca++ appears vital for the contractile response to IBI. IBI did not contract the iris dilator, but shifted the concentration-response curve to the α-adrenoceptor activator, phenylephrine, to the right with a reduction in the maximum response. The tissue failed to regain the sensitivity to phenylephrine after 6 h of repeated washing. Phentolamine and nifedipine provided a small but significant protection of the response to phenylephrine against the irreversible block by IBI. Based on chemical and pharmacological properties of IBI, it is concluded that the molecule acts in the rabbit as an irreversible agonist on unidentified receptors of the iris sphincter and an irreversible antagonist of multiple receptors on the iris dilator. These molecular properties of IBI are clearly different from that of the parent imidazoline molecule tolazoline.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)362-368
Number of pages7
JournalNaunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology
Volume354
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

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Imidazolines
Iris
Rabbits
Muscles
Carbachol
Phenylephrine
Nifedipine
Tolazoline
Papaverine
Phentolamine
Alkylating Agents
Verapamil
Atropine
Indomethacin

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Irreversible agonist and antagonist properties of isothiocyanatobenzyl imidazoline in albino rabbit iris muscles. / Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Miller, Duane; Patil, Popat N.

In: Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology, Vol. 354, No. 3, 01.01.1996, p. 362-368.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "The alkylating agent isothiocyanatobenzyl imidazoline (IBI) was synthesized to investigate the unique receptor interacting properties of imidazolines. On the isolated rabbit iris sphincter, IBI produced concentration-dependent responses with an EC50 of 18 μmol/l, and at the highest concentration tested the maximum contraction of the tissue was 50{\%} of the carbachol maximum. At equiactive concentrations with the similar washing procedure, the total duration of responses to IBI and carbachol was 24 and 3 min, respectively. After repeated washing, the sphincter relaxes to the control baseline of tone but, after reexposure to IBI for 6 h, failed to contract, indicating that desensitization or irreversible-block has developed. Unlike with carbachol, the sphincter contraction to IBI was not affected by atropine 1 μmol/l, indomethacin 1 μmol/l, verapamil 10 μmol/l, or nifedipine 10 μmol/l. At a higher concentration of nifedipine and papaverine 100 μmol/l, the response to IBI was blocked. Furthermore, the contractile response to IBI was abolished by Ca++ removal from the medium. Under similar conditions, 26 ± 8{\%} of the maximum response to carbachol was preserved. Thus influx of extracellular as well as rise in intracellular Ca++ appears vital for the contractile response to IBI. IBI did not contract the iris dilator, but shifted the concentration-response curve to the α-adrenoceptor activator, phenylephrine, to the right with a reduction in the maximum response. The tissue failed to regain the sensitivity to phenylephrine after 6 h of repeated washing. Phentolamine and nifedipine provided a small but significant protection of the response to phenylephrine against the irreversible block by IBI. Based on chemical and pharmacological properties of IBI, it is concluded that the molecule acts in the rabbit as an irreversible agonist on unidentified receptors of the iris sphincter and an irreversible antagonist of multiple receptors on the iris dilator. These molecular properties of IBI are clearly different from that of the parent imidazoline molecule tolazoline.",
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