Is flow diversion the death of cerebral bypass and coiling/stent-assisted coiling for giant cavernous aneurysms? A critical review on comparative outcomes and ongoing clinical trials

Tobias A. Mattei, Andrew Ferrell, Gavin W. Britz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The classic surgical treatment for symptomatic giant aneurysms originating from the cavernous segment of the carotid artery has been either microsurgical direct clip-reconstruction or carotid occlusion followed by additional cerebral bypass for those patients who fail in a balloon test occlusion. Nevertheless the emergence of new endovascular techniques, especially flow-diverting devices, has promised to revolutionize the treatment of giant cavernous aneurysms, possibly avoiding major microsurgical operations. In this review the authors summarize the current "state-of-art" of treatment of giant cavernous aneurysms, comparing the overall outcomes, complications, morbidity and mortality rates of new flow-diverting devices in relation to traditional microsurgical series.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)505-512
Number of pages8
JournalNeurosurgical Review
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013

Fingerprint

Stents
Aneurysm
Clinical Trials
Balloon Occlusion
Equipment and Supplies
Endovascular Procedures
Carotid Arteries
Surgical Instruments
Therapeutics
Morbidity
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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AU - Britz, Gavin W.

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AB - The classic surgical treatment for symptomatic giant aneurysms originating from the cavernous segment of the carotid artery has been either microsurgical direct clip-reconstruction or carotid occlusion followed by additional cerebral bypass for those patients who fail in a balloon test occlusion. Nevertheless the emergence of new endovascular techniques, especially flow-diverting devices, has promised to revolutionize the treatment of giant cavernous aneurysms, possibly avoiding major microsurgical operations. In this review the authors summarize the current "state-of-art" of treatment of giant cavernous aneurysms, comparing the overall outcomes, complications, morbidity and mortality rates of new flow-diverting devices in relation to traditional microsurgical series.

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