Is it live or is it Memorex? Student oral examinations and the use of video for additional scoring

Kenneth Burchard, Horace Henriques, Daniel Walsh, Debra Ludington, Pamela A. Rowland, Donald S. Likosky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Oral examination interrater consistency has been questioned, supporting the use of at least paired examiners and consensus grading. The scheduling flexibility of video recording allows more examiners to score performances. The purpose of this study was to compare live performance with video performance scores to assess interrater differences and the effect on grading. Methods: A total of 283 consecutive, structured, videotaped 30-minute examinations were reviewed. A 5-point Likert scale ranked problem solving (2 cases), verbal skills, and nonverbal skills. Nonparametric paired analyses tested for differences. Results: Live performance scores were higher for verbal and nonverbal skills and total scores. Video performance scores were higher for problem solving for the first presented case. The largest difference (.29 Likert point) was in nonverbal skills. Conclusions: The minor yet statistical differences in several scores did not actually impact student grades. The use of video recording is sufficiently reliable to be continued and advocated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-236
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume193
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Oral Diagnosis
Video Recording
Students
Consensus

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Burchard, K., Henriques, H., Walsh, D., Ludington, D., Rowland, P. A., & Likosky, D. S. (2007). Is it live or is it Memorex? Student oral examinations and the use of video for additional scoring. American Journal of Surgery, 193(2), 233-236. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2006.10.011

Is it live or is it Memorex? Student oral examinations and the use of video for additional scoring. / Burchard, Kenneth; Henriques, Horace; Walsh, Daniel; Ludington, Debra; Rowland, Pamela A.; Likosky, Donald S.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 193, No. 2, 01.02.2007, p. 233-236.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burchard, K, Henriques, H, Walsh, D, Ludington, D, Rowland, PA & Likosky, DS 2007, 'Is it live or is it Memorex? Student oral examinations and the use of video for additional scoring', American Journal of Surgery, vol. 193, no. 2, pp. 233-236. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2006.10.011
Burchard, Kenneth ; Henriques, Horace ; Walsh, Daniel ; Ludington, Debra ; Rowland, Pamela A. ; Likosky, Donald S. / Is it live or is it Memorex? Student oral examinations and the use of video for additional scoring. In: American Journal of Surgery. 2007 ; Vol. 193, No. 2. pp. 233-236.
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