Is renal revascularization in diabetic patients worthwhile?

K. J. Hansen, A. H. Lundberg, M. E. Benjamin, W. J. Casey, T. E. Craven, A. J. Bleyer, R. H. Dean, Mitchell Goldman, F. Robicsek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Purpose: This retrospective review describes surgical management of atherosclerotic renovascular disease (RVD) in hypertensive adults with diabetes mellitus. Methods: From July 1987 through July 1995, 54 consecutive hypertensive diabetics (mean 213/103 mm Hg; mean medications three drugs) requiring either insulin (16 patients) or oral hypoglycemic therapy (38 patients) had operative repair of atherosclerotic RVD. Renal dysfunction (serum creatinine [SCr] ≤1.3 mg/dl) was present in 82% of patients (mean SCr 2.4 mg/dl). Associations between blood pressure and renal function response to operation and preoperative parameters were examined. Clinical characteristics, response to operation, and dialysis-free survival were compared with those of 291 nondiabetic patients. Results: Four (7.4%) operative deaths occurred. Among 50 survivors blood pressure response was considered cured or improved in 72% and unchanged in 28%. Of 42 patients with renal dysfunction 40% had improved function including three patients removed from dialysis. No preoperative parameter examined demonstrated a significant association with blood pressure or renal function response. During follow-up 10 additional patient deaths occurred, and eight patients progressed to dialysis dependence. Time to death or dialysis was associated with preoperative estimates of glomerular filtration (p = 0.03) and the change in estimates of glomerular filtration after operation (p = 0.01). Compared with 291 nondiabetics, the diabetic group had no statistical difference in improved function response (40% vs 51%, p = 0.21); however, diabetics had a significantly lower rate of beneficial blood pressure response (72% vs 89%, p = 0.01) and an increased risk of dialysis or death during follow-up (p = 0.02). By multivariate analysis independent predictors of tune to death or dialysis included the presence of diabetes mellitus, patient age, history of congestive heart failure, and increased serum creatinine. Conclusions: Most of the selected diabetic patients had a beneficial blood pressure response after undergoing operative repair of atherosclerotic RVD, albeit at a lower rate compared with nondiabetics. In diabetics poor renal function before and after operation was associated with progression to dialysis and death. Improved renal function after operation was associated with improved survival; however, function response to renal revascularization was difficult to predict.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)383-393
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Kidney
Dialysis
Blood Pressure
Creatinine
Diabetes Mellitus
Serum
Survival
Hypoglycemic Agents
Survivors
Multivariate Analysis
Heart Failure
Insulin
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Hansen, K. J., Lundberg, A. H., Benjamin, M. E., Casey, W. J., Craven, T. E., Bleyer, A. J., ... Robicsek, F. (1996). Is renal revascularization in diabetic patients worthwhile? Journal of Vascular Surgery, 24(3), 383-393. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0741-5214(96)70194-5

Is renal revascularization in diabetic patients worthwhile? / Hansen, K. J.; Lundberg, A. H.; Benjamin, M. E.; Casey, W. J.; Craven, T. E.; Bleyer, A. J.; Dean, R. H.; Goldman, Mitchell; Robicsek, F.

In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 24, No. 3, 01.01.1996, p. 383-393.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hansen, KJ, Lundberg, AH, Benjamin, ME, Casey, WJ, Craven, TE, Bleyer, AJ, Dean, RH, Goldman, M & Robicsek, F 1996, 'Is renal revascularization in diabetic patients worthwhile?', Journal of Vascular Surgery, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 383-393. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0741-5214(96)70194-5
Hansen KJ, Lundberg AH, Benjamin ME, Casey WJ, Craven TE, Bleyer AJ et al. Is renal revascularization in diabetic patients worthwhile? Journal of Vascular Surgery. 1996 Jan 1;24(3):383-393. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0741-5214(96)70194-5
Hansen, K. J. ; Lundberg, A. H. ; Benjamin, M. E. ; Casey, W. J. ; Craven, T. E. ; Bleyer, A. J. ; Dean, R. H. ; Goldman, Mitchell ; Robicsek, F. / Is renal revascularization in diabetic patients worthwhile?. In: Journal of Vascular Surgery. 1996 ; Vol. 24, No. 3. pp. 383-393.
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abstract = "Purpose: This retrospective review describes surgical management of atherosclerotic renovascular disease (RVD) in hypertensive adults with diabetes mellitus. Methods: From July 1987 through July 1995, 54 consecutive hypertensive diabetics (mean 213/103 mm Hg; mean medications three drugs) requiring either insulin (16 patients) or oral hypoglycemic therapy (38 patients) had operative repair of atherosclerotic RVD. Renal dysfunction (serum creatinine [SCr] ≤1.3 mg/dl) was present in 82{\%} of patients (mean SCr 2.4 mg/dl). Associations between blood pressure and renal function response to operation and preoperative parameters were examined. Clinical characteristics, response to operation, and dialysis-free survival were compared with those of 291 nondiabetic patients. Results: Four (7.4{\%}) operative deaths occurred. Among 50 survivors blood pressure response was considered cured or improved in 72{\%} and unchanged in 28{\%}. Of 42 patients with renal dysfunction 40{\%} had improved function including three patients removed from dialysis. No preoperative parameter examined demonstrated a significant association with blood pressure or renal function response. During follow-up 10 additional patient deaths occurred, and eight patients progressed to dialysis dependence. Time to death or dialysis was associated with preoperative estimates of glomerular filtration (p = 0.03) and the change in estimates of glomerular filtration after operation (p = 0.01). Compared with 291 nondiabetics, the diabetic group had no statistical difference in improved function response (40{\%} vs 51{\%}, p = 0.21); however, diabetics had a significantly lower rate of beneficial blood pressure response (72{\%} vs 89{\%}, p = 0.01) and an increased risk of dialysis or death during follow-up (p = 0.02). By multivariate analysis independent predictors of tune to death or dialysis included the presence of diabetes mellitus, patient age, history of congestive heart failure, and increased serum creatinine. Conclusions: Most of the selected diabetic patients had a beneficial blood pressure response after undergoing operative repair of atherosclerotic RVD, albeit at a lower rate compared with nondiabetics. In diabetics poor renal function before and after operation was associated with progression to dialysis and death. Improved renal function after operation was associated with improved survival; however, function response to renal revascularization was difficult to predict.",
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AU - Hansen, K. J.

AU - Lundberg, A. H.

AU - Benjamin, M. E.

AU - Casey, W. J.

AU - Craven, T. E.

AU - Bleyer, A. J.

AU - Dean, R. H.

AU - Goldman, Mitchell

AU - Robicsek, F.

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N2 - Purpose: This retrospective review describes surgical management of atherosclerotic renovascular disease (RVD) in hypertensive adults with diabetes mellitus. Methods: From July 1987 through July 1995, 54 consecutive hypertensive diabetics (mean 213/103 mm Hg; mean medications three drugs) requiring either insulin (16 patients) or oral hypoglycemic therapy (38 patients) had operative repair of atherosclerotic RVD. Renal dysfunction (serum creatinine [SCr] ≤1.3 mg/dl) was present in 82% of patients (mean SCr 2.4 mg/dl). Associations between blood pressure and renal function response to operation and preoperative parameters were examined. Clinical characteristics, response to operation, and dialysis-free survival were compared with those of 291 nondiabetic patients. Results: Four (7.4%) operative deaths occurred. Among 50 survivors blood pressure response was considered cured or improved in 72% and unchanged in 28%. Of 42 patients with renal dysfunction 40% had improved function including three patients removed from dialysis. No preoperative parameter examined demonstrated a significant association with blood pressure or renal function response. During follow-up 10 additional patient deaths occurred, and eight patients progressed to dialysis dependence. Time to death or dialysis was associated with preoperative estimates of glomerular filtration (p = 0.03) and the change in estimates of glomerular filtration after operation (p = 0.01). Compared with 291 nondiabetics, the diabetic group had no statistical difference in improved function response (40% vs 51%, p = 0.21); however, diabetics had a significantly lower rate of beneficial blood pressure response (72% vs 89%, p = 0.01) and an increased risk of dialysis or death during follow-up (p = 0.02). By multivariate analysis independent predictors of tune to death or dialysis included the presence of diabetes mellitus, patient age, history of congestive heart failure, and increased serum creatinine. Conclusions: Most of the selected diabetic patients had a beneficial blood pressure response after undergoing operative repair of atherosclerotic RVD, albeit at a lower rate compared with nondiabetics. In diabetics poor renal function before and after operation was associated with progression to dialysis and death. Improved renal function after operation was associated with improved survival; however, function response to renal revascularization was difficult to predict.

AB - Purpose: This retrospective review describes surgical management of atherosclerotic renovascular disease (RVD) in hypertensive adults with diabetes mellitus. Methods: From July 1987 through July 1995, 54 consecutive hypertensive diabetics (mean 213/103 mm Hg; mean medications three drugs) requiring either insulin (16 patients) or oral hypoglycemic therapy (38 patients) had operative repair of atherosclerotic RVD. Renal dysfunction (serum creatinine [SCr] ≤1.3 mg/dl) was present in 82% of patients (mean SCr 2.4 mg/dl). Associations between blood pressure and renal function response to operation and preoperative parameters were examined. Clinical characteristics, response to operation, and dialysis-free survival were compared with those of 291 nondiabetic patients. Results: Four (7.4%) operative deaths occurred. Among 50 survivors blood pressure response was considered cured or improved in 72% and unchanged in 28%. Of 42 patients with renal dysfunction 40% had improved function including three patients removed from dialysis. No preoperative parameter examined demonstrated a significant association with blood pressure or renal function response. During follow-up 10 additional patient deaths occurred, and eight patients progressed to dialysis dependence. Time to death or dialysis was associated with preoperative estimates of glomerular filtration (p = 0.03) and the change in estimates of glomerular filtration after operation (p = 0.01). Compared with 291 nondiabetics, the diabetic group had no statistical difference in improved function response (40% vs 51%, p = 0.21); however, diabetics had a significantly lower rate of beneficial blood pressure response (72% vs 89%, p = 0.01) and an increased risk of dialysis or death during follow-up (p = 0.02). By multivariate analysis independent predictors of tune to death or dialysis included the presence of diabetes mellitus, patient age, history of congestive heart failure, and increased serum creatinine. Conclusions: Most of the selected diabetic patients had a beneficial blood pressure response after undergoing operative repair of atherosclerotic RVD, albeit at a lower rate compared with nondiabetics. In diabetics poor renal function before and after operation was associated with progression to dialysis and death. Improved renal function after operation was associated with improved survival; however, function response to renal revascularization was difficult to predict.

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