Is there a place for teaching obstructive sleep apnea and snoring in the predoctoral dental curriculum?

Chris Ivanoff, Timothy Hottel, Frank Pancratz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The widespread prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea and apneic snoring is both alarming and well documented. Sleep disorders affect one out of five Americans. Yet, during an attempt to study the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea and snoring among patients at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Dentistry, a search through the entire school's database for the terms "sleep apnea" and "snoring" found only ninety-two patients who admitted to snoring. Currently, the condition "sleep apnea" is not even on the school's list of health/medical questions. These figures not only are inconsistent with national statistics, but confirm that more needs to be done to make dental students aware of these disorders, include them in patient medical histories, and ultimately educate patients about therapies that can help. Considering the health concerns related to this sleep disorder, the economic impact of insomnia and daytime sleepiness, as well as the fact that the dentist is well poised to reduce symptoms and increase the quality of life among sufferers, mandibular advancement devices should become an educational standard in the predoctoral clinical curriculum of dental schools. Predoctoral clinical curricula need to reflect this current health trend and train dentists to care for these patients comprehensively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1639-1645
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Dental Education
Volume76
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012

Fingerprint

Snoring
Obstructive Sleep Apnea
sleep
Curriculum
Tooth
Teaching
curriculum
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Dentists
Health
dentist
Mandibular Advancement
Dental Students
Dental Schools
School Health Services
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Dentistry
health
school
Patient Care

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Is there a place for teaching obstructive sleep apnea and snoring in the predoctoral dental curriculum? / Ivanoff, Chris; Hottel, Timothy; Pancratz, Frank.

In: Journal of Dental Education, Vol. 76, No. 12, 01.12.2012, p. 1639-1645.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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