Is Weight Gain After Smoking Cessation Inevitable?

Gerald Talcott, Edna R. Fiedler, Randy W. Pascale, Robert Klesges, Alan L. Peterson, Ronald S. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Weight gain after smoking cessation was studied in a naturalistic setting where (1) all smokers quit and (b) risk factors for postcessation weight gain were modified. Participants were 332 military recruits (227 men, 105 women), 86 of whom were smokers who quit during 6 weeks of basic training. Results showed no significant weight changes for smokers who quit. Pretest smoking rates and feat of weight gain were unrelated to changes in weight. Results suggest that an intensive program that limits access to alcohol and foods that are high in fat and that increases physical activity can attenuate weight gain after smoking cessation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)313-316
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume63
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

Fingerprint

Smoking Cessation
Weight Gain
Weights and Measures
Smoking
Fats
Alcohols
Exercise
Food

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Talcott, G., Fiedler, E. R., Pascale, R. W., Klesges, R., Peterson, A. L., & Johnson, R. S. (1995). Is Weight Gain After Smoking Cessation Inevitable? Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 63(2), 313-316. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-006X.63.2.313

Is Weight Gain After Smoking Cessation Inevitable? / Talcott, Gerald; Fiedler, Edna R.; Pascale, Randy W.; Klesges, Robert; Peterson, Alan L.; Johnson, Ronald S.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 63, No. 2, 01.01.1995, p. 313-316.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Talcott, G, Fiedler, ER, Pascale, RW, Klesges, R, Peterson, AL & Johnson, RS 1995, 'Is Weight Gain After Smoking Cessation Inevitable?', Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 63, no. 2, pp. 313-316. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-006X.63.2.313
Talcott G, Fiedler ER, Pascale RW, Klesges R, Peterson AL, Johnson RS. Is Weight Gain After Smoking Cessation Inevitable? Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 1995 Jan 1;63(2):313-316. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-006X.63.2.313
Talcott, Gerald ; Fiedler, Edna R. ; Pascale, Randy W. ; Klesges, Robert ; Peterson, Alan L. ; Johnson, Ronald S. / Is Weight Gain After Smoking Cessation Inevitable?. In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 1995 ; Vol. 63, No. 2. pp. 313-316.
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