Isokinetic strength testing in research and practice

Jean M. Gaines, Laura Talbot

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Age-related losses in lower extremity strength result in functional disabilities that diminish the quality of life for many older adults. Multiple factors, including type of muscle fiber, size of the muscle, length and speed of the muscle at contraction, age, and gender, affect the magnitude of strength generated. Assessment in clinical practice, in order to be cost and time effective, screens older adults for loss in strength. Further evaluation of strength loss requires the use of sophisticated procedures and equipment. Research into the causes of loss of strength and interventions to lessen or prevent loss of strength requires valid and reliable assessment tools. This article examines components of isokinetic muscle strength, the measurement of strength in clinical practice, methods to measure isokinetic strength, and validity and reliability of these measures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-64
Number of pages8
JournalBiological Research for Nursing
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Muscles
Muscle Strength
Muscle Contraction
Research
Reproducibility of Results
Lower Extremity
Quality of Life
Costs and Cost Analysis
Equipment and Supplies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Research and Theory

Cite this

Isokinetic strength testing in research and practice. / Gaines, Jean M.; Talbot, Laura.

In: Biological Research for Nursing, Vol. 1, No. 1, 01.12.1999, p. 57-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ba50c74edffa45f39f07b287ebd01b68,
title = "Isokinetic strength testing in research and practice",
abstract = "Age-related losses in lower extremity strength result in functional disabilities that diminish the quality of life for many older adults. Multiple factors, including type of muscle fiber, size of the muscle, length and speed of the muscle at contraction, age, and gender, affect the magnitude of strength generated. Assessment in clinical practice, in order to be cost and time effective, screens older adults for loss in strength. Further evaluation of strength loss requires the use of sophisticated procedures and equipment. Research into the causes of loss of strength and interventions to lessen or prevent loss of strength requires valid and reliable assessment tools. This article examines components of isokinetic muscle strength, the measurement of strength in clinical practice, methods to measure isokinetic strength, and validity and reliability of these measures.",
author = "Gaines, {Jean M.} and Laura Talbot",
year = "1999",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/109980049900100108",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "1",
pages = "57--64",
journal = "Biological Research for Nursing",
issn = "1099-8004",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Isokinetic strength testing in research and practice

AU - Gaines, Jean M.

AU - Talbot, Laura

PY - 1999/12/1

Y1 - 1999/12/1

N2 - Age-related losses in lower extremity strength result in functional disabilities that diminish the quality of life for many older adults. Multiple factors, including type of muscle fiber, size of the muscle, length and speed of the muscle at contraction, age, and gender, affect the magnitude of strength generated. Assessment in clinical practice, in order to be cost and time effective, screens older adults for loss in strength. Further evaluation of strength loss requires the use of sophisticated procedures and equipment. Research into the causes of loss of strength and interventions to lessen or prevent loss of strength requires valid and reliable assessment tools. This article examines components of isokinetic muscle strength, the measurement of strength in clinical practice, methods to measure isokinetic strength, and validity and reliability of these measures.

AB - Age-related losses in lower extremity strength result in functional disabilities that diminish the quality of life for many older adults. Multiple factors, including type of muscle fiber, size of the muscle, length and speed of the muscle at contraction, age, and gender, affect the magnitude of strength generated. Assessment in clinical practice, in order to be cost and time effective, screens older adults for loss in strength. Further evaluation of strength loss requires the use of sophisticated procedures and equipment. Research into the causes of loss of strength and interventions to lessen or prevent loss of strength requires valid and reliable assessment tools. This article examines components of isokinetic muscle strength, the measurement of strength in clinical practice, methods to measure isokinetic strength, and validity and reliability of these measures.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033157110&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033157110&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/109980049900100108

DO - 10.1177/109980049900100108

M3 - Article

VL - 1

SP - 57

EP - 64

JO - Biological Research for Nursing

JF - Biological Research for Nursing

SN - 1099-8004

IS - 1

ER -