Job sharing for women pharmacists in academia

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The pharmacist shortage, increasing numbers of female pharmacy graduates, more pharmacy schools requiring faculty members, and a lower percentage of female faculty in academia are reasons to develop unique arrangements for female academic pharmacists who wish to work part-time. Job sharing is an example of a flexible alternative work arrangement that can be successful for academic pharmacists who wish to continue in a part-time capacity. Such partnerships have worked for other professionals but have not been widely adopted in pharmacy academia. Job sharing can benefit the employer through retention of experienced employees who collectively offer a wider range of skills than a single employee. Benefits to the employee include balanced work and family lives with the ability to maintain their knowledge and skills by remaining in the workforce. We discuss the additional benefits of job-sharing as well as our experience in a non-tenure track job-sharing position at the University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number135
JournalAmerican journal of pharmaceutical education
Volume73
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

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job sharing
pharmacist
Pharmacists
employee
Pharmacy Schools
Aptitude
academic (female)
part-time work
shortage
employer
graduate
ability
school
experience

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Job sharing for women pharmacists in academia. / Rogers, Kelly; Finks, Shannon.

In: American journal of pharmaceutical education, Vol. 73, No. 7, 135, 01.01.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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