Ketosis proportionately spares glucose utilization in brain

Yifan Zhang, Youzhi Kuang, Kui Xu, Donald Harris, Zhenghong Lee, Joseph Lamanna, Michelle Puchowicz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The brain is dependent on glucose as a primary energy substrate, but is capable of utilizing ketones such as β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, as occurs with fasting, starvation, or chronic feeding of a ketogenic diet. The relationship between changes in cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMR glc) and degree or duration of ketosis remains uncertain. To investigate if CMR glc decreases with chronic ketosis, 2-[ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose in combination with positron emission tomography, was applied in anesthetized young adult rats fed 3 weeks of either standard or ketogenic diets. Cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (μmol/min per 100 g) was determined in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum using Gjedde-Patlak analysis. The average CMR glc significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex (23.0±4.9 versus 32.9±4.7) and cerebellum (29.3±8.6 versus 41.2±6.4) with increased plasma ketone bodies in the ketotic rats compared with standard diet group. The reduction of CMR glc in both brain regions correlates linearly by ∼9% for each 1 mmol/L increase of total plasma ketone bodies (0.3 to 6.3 mmol/L). Together with our meta-analysis, these data revealed that the degree and duration of ketosis has a major role in determining the corresponding change in CMR glc with ketosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1307-1311
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
Volume33
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2013

Fingerprint

Ketosis
Glucose
Brain
Ketogenic Diet
Ketone Bodies
Cerebral Cortex
Cerebellum
Hydroxybutyrates
Deoxyglucose
Starvation
Ketones
Positron-Emission Tomography
Meta-Analysis
Young Adult
Fasting
Diet

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Ketosis proportionately spares glucose utilization in brain. / Zhang, Yifan; Kuang, Youzhi; Xu, Kui; Harris, Donald; Lee, Zhenghong; Lamanna, Joseph; Puchowicz, Michelle.

In: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, Vol. 33, No. 8, 01.08.2013, p. 1307-1311.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhang, Yifan ; Kuang, Youzhi ; Xu, Kui ; Harris, Donald ; Lee, Zhenghong ; Lamanna, Joseph ; Puchowicz, Michelle. / Ketosis proportionately spares glucose utilization in brain. In: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism. 2013 ; Vol. 33, No. 8. pp. 1307-1311.
@article{44a1a64392f24d6f926f37ab96cbace1,
title = "Ketosis proportionately spares glucose utilization in brain",
abstract = "The brain is dependent on glucose as a primary energy substrate, but is capable of utilizing ketones such as β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, as occurs with fasting, starvation, or chronic feeding of a ketogenic diet. The relationship between changes in cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMR glc) and degree or duration of ketosis remains uncertain. To investigate if CMR glc decreases with chronic ketosis, 2-[ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose in combination with positron emission tomography, was applied in anesthetized young adult rats fed 3 weeks of either standard or ketogenic diets. Cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (μmol/min per 100 g) was determined in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum using Gjedde-Patlak analysis. The average CMR glc significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex (23.0±4.9 versus 32.9±4.7) and cerebellum (29.3±8.6 versus 41.2±6.4) with increased plasma ketone bodies in the ketotic rats compared with standard diet group. The reduction of CMR glc in both brain regions correlates linearly by ∼9{\%} for each 1 mmol/L increase of total plasma ketone bodies (0.3 to 6.3 mmol/L). Together with our meta-analysis, these data revealed that the degree and duration of ketosis has a major role in determining the corresponding change in CMR glc with ketosis.",
author = "Yifan Zhang and Youzhi Kuang and Kui Xu and Donald Harris and Zhenghong Lee and Joseph Lamanna and Michelle Puchowicz",
year = "2013",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/jcbfm.2013.87",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
pages = "1307--1311",
journal = "Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism",
issn = "0271-678X",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ketosis proportionately spares glucose utilization in brain

AU - Zhang, Yifan

AU - Kuang, Youzhi

AU - Xu, Kui

AU - Harris, Donald

AU - Lee, Zhenghong

AU - Lamanna, Joseph

AU - Puchowicz, Michelle

PY - 2013/8/1

Y1 - 2013/8/1

N2 - The brain is dependent on glucose as a primary energy substrate, but is capable of utilizing ketones such as β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, as occurs with fasting, starvation, or chronic feeding of a ketogenic diet. The relationship between changes in cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMR glc) and degree or duration of ketosis remains uncertain. To investigate if CMR glc decreases with chronic ketosis, 2-[ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose in combination with positron emission tomography, was applied in anesthetized young adult rats fed 3 weeks of either standard or ketogenic diets. Cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (μmol/min per 100 g) was determined in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum using Gjedde-Patlak analysis. The average CMR glc significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex (23.0±4.9 versus 32.9±4.7) and cerebellum (29.3±8.6 versus 41.2±6.4) with increased plasma ketone bodies in the ketotic rats compared with standard diet group. The reduction of CMR glc in both brain regions correlates linearly by ∼9% for each 1 mmol/L increase of total plasma ketone bodies (0.3 to 6.3 mmol/L). Together with our meta-analysis, these data revealed that the degree and duration of ketosis has a major role in determining the corresponding change in CMR glc with ketosis.

AB - The brain is dependent on glucose as a primary energy substrate, but is capable of utilizing ketones such as β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, as occurs with fasting, starvation, or chronic feeding of a ketogenic diet. The relationship between changes in cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMR glc) and degree or duration of ketosis remains uncertain. To investigate if CMR glc decreases with chronic ketosis, 2-[ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose in combination with positron emission tomography, was applied in anesthetized young adult rats fed 3 weeks of either standard or ketogenic diets. Cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (μmol/min per 100 g) was determined in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum using Gjedde-Patlak analysis. The average CMR glc significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex (23.0±4.9 versus 32.9±4.7) and cerebellum (29.3±8.6 versus 41.2±6.4) with increased plasma ketone bodies in the ketotic rats compared with standard diet group. The reduction of CMR glc in both brain regions correlates linearly by ∼9% for each 1 mmol/L increase of total plasma ketone bodies (0.3 to 6.3 mmol/L). Together with our meta-analysis, these data revealed that the degree and duration of ketosis has a major role in determining the corresponding change in CMR glc with ketosis.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84881148989&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84881148989&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/jcbfm.2013.87

DO - 10.1038/jcbfm.2013.87

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 1307

EP - 1311

JO - Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism

JF - Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism

SN - 0271-678X

IS - 8

ER -