Knotting the NETs

Analyzing histone modifications in neutrophil extracellular traps

Indira Neeli, Marko Radic

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neutrophil extracellular chromatin traps (NETs) are a recently described mechanism of innate immune responses to bacteria and fungi. Evidence indicates that NETs are induced by inflammation, that they contribute to diverse disease pathologies, and that they associate with bactericidal substances. Genomic DNA is released in NETs, leading to a cell death that has been labeled NETosis. Although NETosis clearly differs from apoptosis, the classical form of cell death, recent experiments indicate a connection between NETosis and autophagy. The regulated deployment of NETs may require covalent modification of histones, the basic DNA-binding proteins that organize chromatin in the cell's nucleus and within NETs. Histone modification by peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) is necessary for NET release. The functions of additional histone modifications, however, remain to be tested.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number115
JournalArthritis Research and Therapy
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 6 2012

Fingerprint

Histone Code
Chromatin
Cell Death
Autophagy
DNA-Binding Proteins
Extracellular Traps
Cell Nucleus
Innate Immunity
Fungi
Apoptosis
Pathology
Inflammation
Bacteria
DNA

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Knotting the NETs : Analyzing histone modifications in neutrophil extracellular traps. / Neeli, Indira; Radic, Marko.

In: Arthritis Research and Therapy, Vol. 14, No. 2, 115, 06.04.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

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AB - Neutrophil extracellular chromatin traps (NETs) are a recently described mechanism of innate immune responses to bacteria and fungi. Evidence indicates that NETs are induced by inflammation, that they contribute to diverse disease pathologies, and that they associate with bactericidal substances. Genomic DNA is released in NETs, leading to a cell death that has been labeled NETosis. Although NETosis clearly differs from apoptosis, the classical form of cell death, recent experiments indicate a connection between NETosis and autophagy. The regulated deployment of NETs may require covalent modification of histones, the basic DNA-binding proteins that organize chromatin in the cell's nucleus and within NETs. Histone modification by peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) is necessary for NET release. The functions of additional histone modifications, however, remain to be tested.

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