Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of women about the importance of prostate cancer screening

Kristi Blanchard, Tracy Proverbs-Singh, Adrienne Katner, Deborah Lifsey, Steven Pollard, Walter Rayford

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To understand women's knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about prostate cancer. Methods: A survey was self-administered to 324 women age >18 years. It contained 42 questions that assessed women's knowledge about prostate cancer, possible risk factors, and opinions regarding screening and early detection. Women were grouped as married or unmarried for convenient comparisons. Chi-squared and F statistics were performed. Results: Ninety-seven percent of married women reported having some influence over the healthcare decisions of their spouse. Married women's worst fear about their spouse or family member's diagnosis of prostate cancer was death. The most important benefit of prostate cancer screening was the possibility of cure, while the main hindrance was fear of the digital rectal exam. Marital status, age, educational level and income were all significantly associated with women's knowledge about prostate cancer (p≤0.001). Conclusions: Women play an important role in health-related matters in the home. Educating women on prostate cancer may improve early detection efforts and reduce the devastating impact of this disease on their family.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1378-1385
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume97
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Early Detection of Cancer
Prostatic Neoplasms
Spouses
Fear
Marital Status
Delivery of Health Care
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Blanchard, K., Proverbs-Singh, T., Katner, A., Lifsey, D., Pollard, S., & Rayford, W. (2005). Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of women about the importance of prostate cancer screening. Journal of the National Medical Association, 97(10), 1378-1385.

Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of women about the importance of prostate cancer screening. / Blanchard, Kristi; Proverbs-Singh, Tracy; Katner, Adrienne; Lifsey, Deborah; Pollard, Steven; Rayford, Walter.

In: Journal of the National Medical Association, Vol. 97, No. 10, 01.10.2005, p. 1378-1385.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Blanchard, K, Proverbs-Singh, T, Katner, A, Lifsey, D, Pollard, S & Rayford, W 2005, 'Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of women about the importance of prostate cancer screening', Journal of the National Medical Association, vol. 97, no. 10, pp. 1378-1385.
Blanchard, Kristi ; Proverbs-Singh, Tracy ; Katner, Adrienne ; Lifsey, Deborah ; Pollard, Steven ; Rayford, Walter. / Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of women about the importance of prostate cancer screening. In: Journal of the National Medical Association. 2005 ; Vol. 97, No. 10. pp. 1378-1385.
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