Labour supply of informal caregivers

Cyril F. Chang, Shelley I. White-Means

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper contributes to the informal caregiving literature by investigating the relationship between caregiving and the caregiver’s labour market decisions. Its main interest is in determining the factors that affect the caregiver’s decisions to remain in the work force and the amount of time he/she chooses to work. A major finding is that non-wage income, wage rate, education, the make-up of the caregiving network, and a host of identifiable sociodemographic factors influence the caregiver’s labour market decisions. Another finding is that some of the sociodemographic factors, e.g., gender and living arrangements, affect the decision to work but not the number of hours of work, and vice versa. The paper concludes with a discussion of future studies and public policy implications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)192-205
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Review of Applied Economics
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

Fingerprint

Labor supply
Caregivers
Caregiving
Factors
Labour market
Workforce
Public policy
Wage rate
Living arrangements
Hours of work
Policy implications
Influence factors
Education
Income

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Labour supply of informal caregivers. / Chang, Cyril F.; White-Means, Shelley I.

In: International Review of Applied Economics, Vol. 9, No. 2, 01.01.1995, p. 192-205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{230766c4cca04c35bbb19470592ebc4e,
title = "Labour supply of informal caregivers",
abstract = "This paper contributes to the informal caregiving literature by investigating the relationship between caregiving and the caregiver’s labour market decisions. Its main interest is in determining the factors that affect the caregiver’s decisions to remain in the work force and the amount of time he/she chooses to work. A major finding is that non-wage income, wage rate, education, the make-up of the caregiving network, and a host of identifiable sociodemographic factors influence the caregiver’s labour market decisions. Another finding is that some of the sociodemographic factors, e.g., gender and living arrangements, affect the decision to work but not the number of hours of work, and vice versa. The paper concludes with a discussion of future studies and public policy implications.",
author = "Chang, {Cyril F.} and White-Means, {Shelley I.}",
year = "1995",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/758538252",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
pages = "192--205",
journal = "International Review of Applied Economics",
issn = "0269-2171",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Labour supply of informal caregivers

AU - Chang, Cyril F.

AU - White-Means, Shelley I.

PY - 1995/1/1

Y1 - 1995/1/1

N2 - This paper contributes to the informal caregiving literature by investigating the relationship between caregiving and the caregiver’s labour market decisions. Its main interest is in determining the factors that affect the caregiver’s decisions to remain in the work force and the amount of time he/she chooses to work. A major finding is that non-wage income, wage rate, education, the make-up of the caregiving network, and a host of identifiable sociodemographic factors influence the caregiver’s labour market decisions. Another finding is that some of the sociodemographic factors, e.g., gender and living arrangements, affect the decision to work but not the number of hours of work, and vice versa. The paper concludes with a discussion of future studies and public policy implications.

AB - This paper contributes to the informal caregiving literature by investigating the relationship between caregiving and the caregiver’s labour market decisions. Its main interest is in determining the factors that affect the caregiver’s decisions to remain in the work force and the amount of time he/she chooses to work. A major finding is that non-wage income, wage rate, education, the make-up of the caregiving network, and a host of identifiable sociodemographic factors influence the caregiver’s labour market decisions. Another finding is that some of the sociodemographic factors, e.g., gender and living arrangements, affect the decision to work but not the number of hours of work, and vice versa. The paper concludes with a discussion of future studies and public policy implications.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=36749047704&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=36749047704&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/758538252

DO - 10.1080/758538252

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:36749047704

VL - 9

SP - 192

EP - 205

JO - International Review of Applied Economics

JF - International Review of Applied Economics

SN - 0269-2171

IS - 2

ER -