Lactic acid bacteria vector vaccines

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Vaccines are currently being developed based on the new concept of designing antigens that can prompt the innate immune system to trigger adaptive immunity and to characterize the T cells that are needed for the desired response. To develop protective immune responses against mucosal pathogens, the delivery route and adjuvants for vaccination are important. The host, however, strives to maintain mucosal homeostasis by responding to mucosal antigens with tolerance. This induction of mucosal immunity through vaccination is a rather difficult task. However, potent mucosal adjuvants, vectors, and other special delivery systems can be used. There is a great need to develop effective mucosal delivery systems that avoid degradation and promote uptake of the antigen in the gastrointestinal tract and stimulate adaptive immune responses, rather than the tolerogenic immune responses seen in studies done with feeding soluble antigens. Lactic acid bacteria have Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) status and have been developed in the past decade as potent adjuvants for mucosal delivery of vaccine antigens. Both Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus spp. have been used. In this chapter I will review the development of a platform technology based in Lactobacillus plantarum to deliver prophylactic molecules orally and will provide an example for plague.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMolecular Vaccines
Subtitle of host publicationFrom Prophylaxis to Therapy - Volume 2
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages767-779
Number of pages13
ISBN (Electronic)9783319009780
ISBN (Print)9783319009773
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Lactic Acid
Vaccines
Bacteria
Antigens
Mucosal Immunity
Adaptive Immunity
Vaccination
Lactobacillus plantarum
Lactococcus lactis
Plague
Lactobacillus
Gastrointestinal Tract
Immune System
Homeostasis
Technology
T-Lymphocytes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Gomes-Solecki, M. (2014). Lactic acid bacteria vector vaccines. In Molecular Vaccines: From Prophylaxis to Therapy - Volume 2 (pp. 767-779). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-00978-0_22

Lactic acid bacteria vector vaccines. / Gomes-Solecki, Maria.

Molecular Vaccines: From Prophylaxis to Therapy - Volume 2. Springer International Publishing, 2014. p. 767-779.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Gomes-Solecki, M 2014, Lactic acid bacteria vector vaccines. in Molecular Vaccines: From Prophylaxis to Therapy - Volume 2. Springer International Publishing, pp. 767-779. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-00978-0_22
Gomes-Solecki M. Lactic acid bacteria vector vaccines. In Molecular Vaccines: From Prophylaxis to Therapy - Volume 2. Springer International Publishing. 2014. p. 767-779 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-00978-0_22
Gomes-Solecki, Maria. / Lactic acid bacteria vector vaccines. Molecular Vaccines: From Prophylaxis to Therapy - Volume 2. Springer International Publishing, 2014. pp. 767-779
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