Language dysfunction after stroke and damage to white matter tracts evaluated using diffusion tensor imaging

Joshua I. Breier, K. M. Hasan, W. Zhang, D. Men, Andrew Papanicolaou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

95 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Knowledge of the anatomic basis of aphasia after stroke has both theoretic and clinical implications by informing models of cortical connectivity and providing data for diagnosis and prognosis. In this study we use diffusion tensor imaging to address the relationship between damage to specific white matter tracts and linguistic deficits after left hemisphere stroke. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty patients aged 38-77 years with a history of stroke in the left hemisphere underwent diffusion tensor imaging, structural MR imaging, and language testing. All of the patients were premorbidly right handed and underwent imaging and language testing at least 1 month after stroke. RESULTS: Lower fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the superior longitudinal and arcuate fasciculi of the left hemisphere, an indication of greater damage to these tracts, were correlated with decreased ability to repeat spoken language. Comprehension deficits after stroke were associated with lower FA values in the arcuate fasciculus of the left hemisphere. The findings for repetition were independent of MR imaging ratings of the degree of damage to cortical areas of the left hemisphere involved in language function. There were no findings for homotopic tracts in the right hemisphere. CONCLUSION: This study provides support for a specific role for damage to the superior longitudinal and arcuate fasciculi in the left hemisphere in patients with deficits in repetition of speech in aphasia after stroke.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)483-487
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008

Fingerprint

Diffusion Tensor Imaging
Language
Stroke
Aphasia
Anisotropy
Aptitude
Linguistics
White Matter

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Language dysfunction after stroke and damage to white matter tracts evaluated using diffusion tensor imaging. / Breier, Joshua I.; Hasan, K. M.; Zhang, W.; Men, D.; Papanicolaou, Andrew.

In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, Vol. 29, No. 3, 01.03.2008, p. 483-487.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Breier, Joshua I. ; Hasan, K. M. ; Zhang, W. ; Men, D. ; Papanicolaou, Andrew. / Language dysfunction after stroke and damage to white matter tracts evaluated using diffusion tensor imaging. In: American Journal of Neuroradiology. 2008 ; Vol. 29, No. 3. pp. 483-487.
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