Language dysfunction in epileptic conditions

James Wheless, Panagiotis G. Simos, Ian J. Butler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Epilepsy may disrupt brain functions necessary for language development by its associated intellectual disabilities or directly as a consequence of the seizure disorder. Additionally, in recent years, there has been increasing recognition of the association of epileptiform electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities with language disorders and autism spectrum disorders. Any process that impairs language function has long-term consequences for academic, social, and occupational adjustments in children and adolescents with epilepsy. Furthermore, impairments in specific language abilities can impact memory and learning abilities. This article reviews interictal language function in children and adults with epilepsy; epilepsy surgery and language outcome; and language disorders associated with abnormal EEGs. The relationship between epilepsy and language function is complicated as the neuroanatomic circuits common to both overlap. We demonstrate how magnetoencephalography (MEG) offers the ability to analyze the relationship of language, EEG abnormalities, and epilepsy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)218-228
Number of pages11
JournalSeminars in Pediatric Neurology
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Epilepsy
Language
Aptitude
Language Disorders
Electroencephalography
Social Adjustment
Magnetoencephalography
Language Development
Intellectual Disability
Learning
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Language dysfunction in epileptic conditions. / Wheless, James; Simos, Panagiotis G.; Butler, Ian J.

In: Seminars in Pediatric Neurology, Vol. 9, No. 3, 01.01.2002, p. 218-228.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wheless, James ; Simos, Panagiotis G. ; Butler, Ian J. / Language dysfunction in epileptic conditions. In: Seminars in Pediatric Neurology. 2002 ; Vol. 9, No. 3. pp. 218-228.
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