Laparoscopic fundoplication in the treatment of severe gastroesophageal reflux disease

Preliminary results of a prospective trial

Jeff G. Tucker, Bruce Ramshaw, Charles L. Newman, Mark S. Sims, Edward M. Mason, Titus D. Duncan, George W. Lucas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine the technical feasibility and success of laparoscopic fundoplication in the treatment of severe gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), 18 consecutive adult patients were enrolled in a prospective study. All patients bad received unsuccessful conservative treatment, were refractory to medical management, or had recurrence of symptoms of esophagitis after omeprazole therapy. All patients had severe acid reflux on 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring, endoscopic evidence of previous or ongoing esophagitis, and a defective lower esophageal sphincter on manometry. Complete (Nissen) fundoplication was done in 11 and partial (Toupet) fundoplication in 7 patients; the mean operative time was 183 minutes (range, 120 to 357 minutes). Feedings were initiated on the first postoperative day, and the average length of stay was 2.6 days (range, 1 to 6). There were no deaths or conversions to laparotomy. Postoperative morbidity consisted of transient bloating in three patients and dysphagia requiring dilatation in four patients. Return to work or normal activity averaged 19 days (range, 3 to 28), and 17 patients (94%) reported good to excellent results, with a median follow-up of 7 months. Laparoscopic fundoplication is technically feasible and offers a sound surgical alternative to patients with refractory GERD, but longitudinal follow-up is required to confirm long-term results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)60-64
Number of pages5
JournalSouthern Medical Journal
Volume89
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Fundoplication
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Esophagitis
Therapeutics
Esophageal pH Monitoring
Lower Esophageal Sphincter
Return to Work
Omeprazole
Manometry
Operative Time
Deglutition Disorders
Laparotomy
Dilatation
Length of Stay
Prospective Studies
Morbidity
Recurrence
Acids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Laparoscopic fundoplication in the treatment of severe gastroesophageal reflux disease : Preliminary results of a prospective trial. / Tucker, Jeff G.; Ramshaw, Bruce; Newman, Charles L.; Sims, Mark S.; Mason, Edward M.; Duncan, Titus D.; Lucas, George W.

In: Southern Medical Journal, Vol. 89, No. 1, 01.01.1996, p. 60-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tucker, Jeff G. ; Ramshaw, Bruce ; Newman, Charles L. ; Sims, Mark S. ; Mason, Edward M. ; Duncan, Titus D. ; Lucas, George W. / Laparoscopic fundoplication in the treatment of severe gastroesophageal reflux disease : Preliminary results of a prospective trial. In: Southern Medical Journal. 1996 ; Vol. 89, No. 1. pp. 60-64.
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