Laparoscopic Total Extraperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The patient is usually able to go home on the day of surgery and is allowed to return to activity as tolerated. A prescription for pain medicine is given to the patient and the patient is usually able to switch to antiinflammatories in the first few days. Bruising and swelling of the groin, penis, and scrotum is not uncommon and ice and/or a jockstrap may be used for comfort. Urinary retention in the first 24 hours and constipation in the first few days are also possible and management strategies should be discussed with the patient. Significant wound and mesh complications are extremely rare with the laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair. Drainage from the 10 mm incision is the most common wound complication and usually only requires a dry dressing. After the repair of large hernias, seromas, and/or hematomas are possible as a result of serous fluid and/or blood collection in the space created by the hernia reduction. The patient should be educated and forewarned of this possibility and told that usually no treatment is required. Rarely, aspiration may be considered if there are significant symptoms. In conclusion, the total extraperitoneal approach for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair can be utilized for almost all adult inguinal hernias. The ability to visualize the entire groin bilaterally, widely cover the myopectoneal orifice, and securely fix the mesh to healthy abdominal wall tissue away from nerves will result in a highly effective repair.Figure 1-9.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)34-44
Number of pages11
JournalOperative Techniques in General Surgery
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2006

Fingerprint

Inguinal Hernia
Herniorrhaphy
Groin
Seroma
Nerve Tissue
Scrotum
Aptitude
Urinary Retention
Penis
Wounds and Injuries
Ice
Abdominal Wall
Constipation
Bandages
Hernia
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Hematoma
Prescriptions
Drainage
Anti-Inflammatory Agents

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Laparoscopic Total Extraperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair. / Ramshaw, Bruce.

In: Operative Techniques in General Surgery, Vol. 8, No. 1, 01.03.2006, p. 34-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c0c0e7377f6d4cf88e87f3e901328a83,
title = "Laparoscopic Total Extraperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair",
abstract = "The patient is usually able to go home on the day of surgery and is allowed to return to activity as tolerated. A prescription for pain medicine is given to the patient and the patient is usually able to switch to antiinflammatories in the first few days. Bruising and swelling of the groin, penis, and scrotum is not uncommon and ice and/or a jockstrap may be used for comfort. Urinary retention in the first 24 hours and constipation in the first few days are also possible and management strategies should be discussed with the patient. Significant wound and mesh complications are extremely rare with the laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair. Drainage from the 10 mm incision is the most common wound complication and usually only requires a dry dressing. After the repair of large hernias, seromas, and/or hematomas are possible as a result of serous fluid and/or blood collection in the space created by the hernia reduction. The patient should be educated and forewarned of this possibility and told that usually no treatment is required. Rarely, aspiration may be considered if there are significant symptoms. In conclusion, the total extraperitoneal approach for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair can be utilized for almost all adult inguinal hernias. The ability to visualize the entire groin bilaterally, widely cover the myopectoneal orifice, and securely fix the mesh to healthy abdominal wall tissue away from nerves will result in a highly effective repair.Figure 1-9.",
author = "Bruce Ramshaw",
year = "2006",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1053/j.optechgensurg.2006.04.007",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
pages = "34--44",
journal = "Operative Techniques in General Surgery",
issn = "1524-153X",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Laparoscopic Total Extraperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair

AU - Ramshaw, Bruce

PY - 2006/3/1

Y1 - 2006/3/1

N2 - The patient is usually able to go home on the day of surgery and is allowed to return to activity as tolerated. A prescription for pain medicine is given to the patient and the patient is usually able to switch to antiinflammatories in the first few days. Bruising and swelling of the groin, penis, and scrotum is not uncommon and ice and/or a jockstrap may be used for comfort. Urinary retention in the first 24 hours and constipation in the first few days are also possible and management strategies should be discussed with the patient. Significant wound and mesh complications are extremely rare with the laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair. Drainage from the 10 mm incision is the most common wound complication and usually only requires a dry dressing. After the repair of large hernias, seromas, and/or hematomas are possible as a result of serous fluid and/or blood collection in the space created by the hernia reduction. The patient should be educated and forewarned of this possibility and told that usually no treatment is required. Rarely, aspiration may be considered if there are significant symptoms. In conclusion, the total extraperitoneal approach for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair can be utilized for almost all adult inguinal hernias. The ability to visualize the entire groin bilaterally, widely cover the myopectoneal orifice, and securely fix the mesh to healthy abdominal wall tissue away from nerves will result in a highly effective repair.Figure 1-9.

AB - The patient is usually able to go home on the day of surgery and is allowed to return to activity as tolerated. A prescription for pain medicine is given to the patient and the patient is usually able to switch to antiinflammatories in the first few days. Bruising and swelling of the groin, penis, and scrotum is not uncommon and ice and/or a jockstrap may be used for comfort. Urinary retention in the first 24 hours and constipation in the first few days are also possible and management strategies should be discussed with the patient. Significant wound and mesh complications are extremely rare with the laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair. Drainage from the 10 mm incision is the most common wound complication and usually only requires a dry dressing. After the repair of large hernias, seromas, and/or hematomas are possible as a result of serous fluid and/or blood collection in the space created by the hernia reduction. The patient should be educated and forewarned of this possibility and told that usually no treatment is required. Rarely, aspiration may be considered if there are significant symptoms. In conclusion, the total extraperitoneal approach for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair can be utilized for almost all adult inguinal hernias. The ability to visualize the entire groin bilaterally, widely cover the myopectoneal orifice, and securely fix the mesh to healthy abdominal wall tissue away from nerves will result in a highly effective repair.Figure 1-9.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33745635761&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33745635761&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1053/j.optechgensurg.2006.04.007

DO - 10.1053/j.optechgensurg.2006.04.007

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 34

EP - 44

JO - Operative Techniques in General Surgery

JF - Operative Techniques in General Surgery

SN - 1524-153X

IS - 1

ER -