Laparoscopic transanal minimally invasive surgery (L-TAMIS) versus robotic TAMIS (R-TAMIS)

short-term outcomes and costs of a comparative study

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) has gained worldwide popularity as a method for the local excision of rectal neoplasms. However, it is technically demanding due to limited working space. Robotic TAMIS offers potential enhanced dexterity and ability while allowing for a more aggressive resection with a stable platform. The objective of this study was to review a single institution experience between laparoscopic (L-TAMIS) and robotic TAMIS (R-TAMIS) for treatment of rectal neoplasms and determine if there are significant differences on outcomes. Methods: Forty consecutive patients with rectal neoplasms underwent L-TAMIS or R-TAMIS by two colorectal surgeons from January 2012 to April 2017. We retrospectively reviewed a prospectively maintained database to analyze demographics, peri-operative data, pathology, post-operative complications, and cost. Results: There were no significant differences between L- and R-TAMIS on patient demographics. R-TAMIS showed a statically significant increase in cost of surgery by $880. Median direct cost of L-TAMIS was $3562 compared to $4440.92 for R-TAMIS (p = 0.04). Wider range of total duration for L-TAMIS is likely due to the variability of body habitus and location of rectal neoplasm, which can significantly limit L-TAMIS compare to R-TAMIS. There was a trend toward decreased blood loss in the R-TAMIS group. Mortality was 0% in both groups. Conclusions: After reviewing our experience, we conclude there is no significant difference between L- and R-TAMIS other than total direct cost. We confirmed that both L- and R-TAMIS are safe and associated with low morbidity. The limitations of this study include its small sample size. In the future, we hope to show promising data on R-TAMIS with increased sample size and experience, which may allow for transanal resection not previously feasible. Studies with long-term follow-up assessing oncological and functional results will be mandatory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1981-1987
Number of pages7
JournalSurgical Endoscopy
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 12 2019

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Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures
Robotics
Costs and Cost Analysis
Rectal Neoplasms
Sample Size
Demography
Databases
Pathology
Morbidity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

@article{f66cc7e828214f059466805064f46a42,
title = "Laparoscopic transanal minimally invasive surgery (L-TAMIS) versus robotic TAMIS (R-TAMIS): short-term outcomes and costs of a comparative study",
abstract = "Background: Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) has gained worldwide popularity as a method for the local excision of rectal neoplasms. However, it is technically demanding due to limited working space. Robotic TAMIS offers potential enhanced dexterity and ability while allowing for a more aggressive resection with a stable platform. The objective of this study was to review a single institution experience between laparoscopic (L-TAMIS) and robotic TAMIS (R-TAMIS) for treatment of rectal neoplasms and determine if there are significant differences on outcomes. Methods: Forty consecutive patients with rectal neoplasms underwent L-TAMIS or R-TAMIS by two colorectal surgeons from January 2012 to April 2017. We retrospectively reviewed a prospectively maintained database to analyze demographics, peri-operative data, pathology, post-operative complications, and cost. Results: There were no significant differences between L- and R-TAMIS on patient demographics. R-TAMIS showed a statically significant increase in cost of surgery by $880. Median direct cost of L-TAMIS was $3562 compared to $4440.92 for R-TAMIS (p = 0.04). Wider range of total duration for L-TAMIS is likely due to the variability of body habitus and location of rectal neoplasm, which can significantly limit L-TAMIS compare to R-TAMIS. There was a trend toward decreased blood loss in the R-TAMIS group. Mortality was 0{\%} in both groups. Conclusions: After reviewing our experience, we conclude there is no significant difference between L- and R-TAMIS other than total direct cost. We confirmed that both L- and R-TAMIS are safe and associated with low morbidity. The limitations of this study include its small sample size. In the future, we hope to show promising data on R-TAMIS with increased sample size and experience, which may allow for transanal resection not previously feasible. Studies with long-term follow-up assessing oncological and functional results will be mandatory.",
author = "Lee, {Sung G.} and Andrew Russ and Mark Casillas",
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pages = "1981--1987",
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T1 - Laparoscopic transanal minimally invasive surgery (L-TAMIS) versus robotic TAMIS (R-TAMIS)

T2 - short-term outcomes and costs of a comparative study

AU - Lee, Sung G.

AU - Russ, Andrew

AU - Casillas, Mark

PY - 2019/6/12

Y1 - 2019/6/12

N2 - Background: Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) has gained worldwide popularity as a method for the local excision of rectal neoplasms. However, it is technically demanding due to limited working space. Robotic TAMIS offers potential enhanced dexterity and ability while allowing for a more aggressive resection with a stable platform. The objective of this study was to review a single institution experience between laparoscopic (L-TAMIS) and robotic TAMIS (R-TAMIS) for treatment of rectal neoplasms and determine if there are significant differences on outcomes. Methods: Forty consecutive patients with rectal neoplasms underwent L-TAMIS or R-TAMIS by two colorectal surgeons from January 2012 to April 2017. We retrospectively reviewed a prospectively maintained database to analyze demographics, peri-operative data, pathology, post-operative complications, and cost. Results: There were no significant differences between L- and R-TAMIS on patient demographics. R-TAMIS showed a statically significant increase in cost of surgery by $880. Median direct cost of L-TAMIS was $3562 compared to $4440.92 for R-TAMIS (p = 0.04). Wider range of total duration for L-TAMIS is likely due to the variability of body habitus and location of rectal neoplasm, which can significantly limit L-TAMIS compare to R-TAMIS. There was a trend toward decreased blood loss in the R-TAMIS group. Mortality was 0% in both groups. Conclusions: After reviewing our experience, we conclude there is no significant difference between L- and R-TAMIS other than total direct cost. We confirmed that both L- and R-TAMIS are safe and associated with low morbidity. The limitations of this study include its small sample size. In the future, we hope to show promising data on R-TAMIS with increased sample size and experience, which may allow for transanal resection not previously feasible. Studies with long-term follow-up assessing oncological and functional results will be mandatory.

AB - Background: Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) has gained worldwide popularity as a method for the local excision of rectal neoplasms. However, it is technically demanding due to limited working space. Robotic TAMIS offers potential enhanced dexterity and ability while allowing for a more aggressive resection with a stable platform. The objective of this study was to review a single institution experience between laparoscopic (L-TAMIS) and robotic TAMIS (R-TAMIS) for treatment of rectal neoplasms and determine if there are significant differences on outcomes. Methods: Forty consecutive patients with rectal neoplasms underwent L-TAMIS or R-TAMIS by two colorectal surgeons from January 2012 to April 2017. We retrospectively reviewed a prospectively maintained database to analyze demographics, peri-operative data, pathology, post-operative complications, and cost. Results: There were no significant differences between L- and R-TAMIS on patient demographics. R-TAMIS showed a statically significant increase in cost of surgery by $880. Median direct cost of L-TAMIS was $3562 compared to $4440.92 for R-TAMIS (p = 0.04). Wider range of total duration for L-TAMIS is likely due to the variability of body habitus and location of rectal neoplasm, which can significantly limit L-TAMIS compare to R-TAMIS. There was a trend toward decreased blood loss in the R-TAMIS group. Mortality was 0% in both groups. Conclusions: After reviewing our experience, we conclude there is no significant difference between L- and R-TAMIS other than total direct cost. We confirmed that both L- and R-TAMIS are safe and associated with low morbidity. The limitations of this study include its small sample size. In the future, we hope to show promising data on R-TAMIS with increased sample size and experience, which may allow for transanal resection not previously feasible. Studies with long-term follow-up assessing oncological and functional results will be mandatory.

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U2 - 10.1007/s00464-018-6502-8

DO - 10.1007/s00464-018-6502-8

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VL - 33

SP - 1981

EP - 1987

JO - Surgical Endoscopy

JF - Surgical Endoscopy

SN - 0930-2794

IS - 6

ER -