Laparoscopical repair

D. Berger, M. Bientzle, M. Miserez, K. Tomczyk, F. Penninckx, M. J. Elieson, J. M. Whitaker, K. A. Leblanc, D. Berger, M. Bientzle, Jan F. Kukleta, Bruce Ramshaw

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The incidence of incisional hernias after major abdominal surgery persists at around 20%, implicating the need of a safe and effective technique for repair [7, 23]. Today the need of meshes for augmentation of the abdominal wall is generally accepted because the hernia disease can be explained by a pathological scar formation [16]. The mostly recommended open sublay technique needs separation of the different layers of the abdominal wall, explaining the sometimes high rates of complications reported in the literature [11, 15, 22, 24]. Therefore the laparoscopic approach gains increasing acceptance. It has been generally demonstrated that the rate of wound complications is dramatically decreased after laparoscopic procedures [17, 22, 24, 25]. However, besides the possible complication of unrecognized enterotomy the recurrence rate is still under debate. Since the widespread application of the method the recurrence rates seem to be increasing sometimes exceeding 10% [1-6, 8-10, 13, 17, 22, 26]. The presentation should summarize our experience after more than 600 laparoscopic procedures done for incisional, umbilical, epigastric and parastomal hernias in terms of the reasons for recurrences as well as the treatment of this complication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationRecurrent Hernia
Subtitle of host publicationPrevention and Treatment
PublisherSpringer Berlin Heidelberg
Pages223-251
Number of pages29
ISBN (Print)9783540375456
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Abdominal Wall
Hernia
Recurrence
Umbilicus
Cicatrix
Incidence
Wounds and Injuries
Incisional Hernia

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Berger, D., Bientzle, M., Miserez, M., Tomczyk, K., Penninckx, F., Elieson, M. J., ... Ramshaw, B. (2007). Laparoscopical repair. In Recurrent Hernia: Prevention and Treatment (pp. 223-251). Springer Berlin Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-68988-1_24

Laparoscopical repair. / Berger, D.; Bientzle, M.; Miserez, M.; Tomczyk, K.; Penninckx, F.; Elieson, M. J.; Whitaker, J. M.; Leblanc, K. A.; Berger, D.; Bientzle, M.; Kukleta, Jan F.; Ramshaw, Bruce.

Recurrent Hernia: Prevention and Treatment. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2007. p. 223-251.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Berger, D, Bientzle, M, Miserez, M, Tomczyk, K, Penninckx, F, Elieson, MJ, Whitaker, JM, Leblanc, KA, Berger, D, Bientzle, M, Kukleta, JF & Ramshaw, B 2007, Laparoscopical repair. in Recurrent Hernia: Prevention and Treatment. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp. 223-251. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-68988-1_24
Berger D, Bientzle M, Miserez M, Tomczyk K, Penninckx F, Elieson MJ et al. Laparoscopical repair. In Recurrent Hernia: Prevention and Treatment. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. 2007. p. 223-251 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-68988-1_24
Berger, D. ; Bientzle, M. ; Miserez, M. ; Tomczyk, K. ; Penninckx, F. ; Elieson, M. J. ; Whitaker, J. M. ; Leblanc, K. A. ; Berger, D. ; Bientzle, M. ; Kukleta, Jan F. ; Ramshaw, Bruce. / Laparoscopical repair. Recurrent Hernia: Prevention and Treatment. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2007. pp. 223-251
@inbook{070f807923fb487e84e09538b2e2ae21,
title = "Laparoscopical repair",
abstract = "The incidence of incisional hernias after major abdominal surgery persists at around 20{\%}, implicating the need of a safe and effective technique for repair [7, 23]. Today the need of meshes for augmentation of the abdominal wall is generally accepted because the hernia disease can be explained by a pathological scar formation [16]. The mostly recommended open sublay technique needs separation of the different layers of the abdominal wall, explaining the sometimes high rates of complications reported in the literature [11, 15, 22, 24]. Therefore the laparoscopic approach gains increasing acceptance. It has been generally demonstrated that the rate of wound complications is dramatically decreased after laparoscopic procedures [17, 22, 24, 25]. However, besides the possible complication of unrecognized enterotomy the recurrence rate is still under debate. Since the widespread application of the method the recurrence rates seem to be increasing sometimes exceeding 10{\%} [1-6, 8-10, 13, 17, 22, 26]. The presentation should summarize our experience after more than 600 laparoscopic procedures done for incisional, umbilical, epigastric and parastomal hernias in terms of the reasons for recurrences as well as the treatment of this complication.",
author = "D. Berger and M. Bientzle and M. Miserez and K. Tomczyk and F. Penninckx and Elieson, {M. J.} and Whitaker, {J. M.} and Leblanc, {K. A.} and D. Berger and M. Bientzle and Kukleta, {Jan F.} and Bruce Ramshaw",
year = "2007",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/978-3-540-68988-1_24",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9783540375456",
pages = "223--251",
booktitle = "Recurrent Hernia",
publisher = "Springer Berlin Heidelberg",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Laparoscopical repair

AU - Berger, D.

AU - Bientzle, M.

AU - Miserez, M.

AU - Tomczyk, K.

AU - Penninckx, F.

AU - Elieson, M. J.

AU - Whitaker, J. M.

AU - Leblanc, K. A.

AU - Berger, D.

AU - Bientzle, M.

AU - Kukleta, Jan F.

AU - Ramshaw, Bruce

PY - 2007/12/1

Y1 - 2007/12/1

N2 - The incidence of incisional hernias after major abdominal surgery persists at around 20%, implicating the need of a safe and effective technique for repair [7, 23]. Today the need of meshes for augmentation of the abdominal wall is generally accepted because the hernia disease can be explained by a pathological scar formation [16]. The mostly recommended open sublay technique needs separation of the different layers of the abdominal wall, explaining the sometimes high rates of complications reported in the literature [11, 15, 22, 24]. Therefore the laparoscopic approach gains increasing acceptance. It has been generally demonstrated that the rate of wound complications is dramatically decreased after laparoscopic procedures [17, 22, 24, 25]. However, besides the possible complication of unrecognized enterotomy the recurrence rate is still under debate. Since the widespread application of the method the recurrence rates seem to be increasing sometimes exceeding 10% [1-6, 8-10, 13, 17, 22, 26]. The presentation should summarize our experience after more than 600 laparoscopic procedures done for incisional, umbilical, epigastric and parastomal hernias in terms of the reasons for recurrences as well as the treatment of this complication.

AB - The incidence of incisional hernias after major abdominal surgery persists at around 20%, implicating the need of a safe and effective technique for repair [7, 23]. Today the need of meshes for augmentation of the abdominal wall is generally accepted because the hernia disease can be explained by a pathological scar formation [16]. The mostly recommended open sublay technique needs separation of the different layers of the abdominal wall, explaining the sometimes high rates of complications reported in the literature [11, 15, 22, 24]. Therefore the laparoscopic approach gains increasing acceptance. It has been generally demonstrated that the rate of wound complications is dramatically decreased after laparoscopic procedures [17, 22, 24, 25]. However, besides the possible complication of unrecognized enterotomy the recurrence rate is still under debate. Since the widespread application of the method the recurrence rates seem to be increasing sometimes exceeding 10% [1-6, 8-10, 13, 17, 22, 26]. The presentation should summarize our experience after more than 600 laparoscopic procedures done for incisional, umbilical, epigastric and parastomal hernias in terms of the reasons for recurrences as well as the treatment of this complication.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84892823637&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84892823637&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/978-3-540-68988-1_24

DO - 10.1007/978-3-540-68988-1_24

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9783540375456

SP - 223

EP - 251

BT - Recurrent Hernia

PB - Springer Berlin Heidelberg

ER -