Laryngotracheal trauma

G. Minard, K. A. Kudsk, Martin Croce, J. A. Butts, R. S. Cicala, T. C. Fabian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Laryngotracheal trauma (LTT) is a rare but clinically important injury that may be missed without a high index of suspicion. Forty patients with LTT admitted to the University of Tennessee, Memphis from 1984 through 1989 were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-six patients sustained penetrating (P)-LTT and 14 had blunt (B)-LTT. Three patients with P-LTT and one with B-LTT arrived in full arrest. Sixty-five per cent of blunt injuries, and 100 per cent of penetrating injuries had neck tenderness or overlying evidence of trauma. A combination of angiography, barium swallow, esophagoscopy, CT scan, bronchoscopy and/or laryngoscopy was used for evaluation, depending on the mechanism. Twenty-two of the 23 surviving P-LTT patients underwent surgery; 11 (50%) had concomitant esophageal injury. All patients with complications from P-LTT were in the group with esophageal injury. B-LTT was classified as either mild, moderate, or severe; all 6 severely injured patients had preoperative airway compromise. All complications of B-LTT occurred in the severely injured group. The following conclusions were reached: LTT usually presents with symptoms and/or signs, but they may be minimal and nonspecific. Emergency tracheostomy should not be delayed if ventilation is compromised. Concomitant esophageal injuries are frequent in P-LTT and predispose the patient to postoperative complications. Airway compromise frequently correlates with severity of injury in B-LTT and these patients are also at high risk for complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-187
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume58
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1992

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Wounds and Injuries
Esophagoscopy
Neck Injuries
Nonpenetrating Wounds
Laryngoscopy
Tracheostomy
Bronchoscopy
Barium
Deglutition
Signs and Symptoms
Ventilation
Angiography
Emergencies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Minard, G., Kudsk, K. A., Croce, M., Butts, J. A., Cicala, R. S., & Fabian, T. C. (1992). Laryngotracheal trauma. American Surgeon, 58(3), 181-187.

Laryngotracheal trauma. / Minard, G.; Kudsk, K. A.; Croce, Martin; Butts, J. A.; Cicala, R. S.; Fabian, T. C.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 58, No. 3, 1992, p. 181-187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Minard, G, Kudsk, KA, Croce, M, Butts, JA, Cicala, RS & Fabian, TC 1992, 'Laryngotracheal trauma', American Surgeon, vol. 58, no. 3, pp. 181-187.
Minard G, Kudsk KA, Croce M, Butts JA, Cicala RS, Fabian TC. Laryngotracheal trauma. American Surgeon. 1992;58(3):181-187.
Minard, G. ; Kudsk, K. A. ; Croce, Martin ; Butts, J. A. ; Cicala, R. S. ; Fabian, T. C. / Laryngotracheal trauma. In: American Surgeon. 1992 ; Vol. 58, No. 3. pp. 181-187.
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