Late Bacterial and Fungal Keratitis after Corneal Transplantation: Spectrum of Pathogens, Graft Survival, and Visual Prognosis

David Harris, R. Doyle Stulting, George O. Waring, Louis A. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors reviewed 108 bacterial and fungal corneal ulcers that developed 1 to 72 months after penetrating keratoplasty in 79 eyes of 78 patients. Graft hypesthesia, topical corticosteroid and antibiotic treatment, exposed sutures, epithelial defects, and poor visual acuity commonly predated infectious keratitis. There were 69 bacterial, 34 fungal, and 5 combined infections. Candida albicans and Staphylococcus epidermidis were the most common pathogens. Follow-up after infection averaged 23 months (range, 1–80 months). Despite hospitalization and fortified topical antibiotic treatment, complications such as wound dehiscence and corneal perforation necessitated emergency regraft in 38 (35%) cases. Of 73 previously clear grafts, only 29 (40%) retained clarity. Median visual acuity, 20/200 before infection, fell to counting fingers at last follow-up; 12 eyes lost light perception.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1450-1457
Number of pages8
JournalOphthalmology
Volume95
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988
Externally publishedYes

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Corneal Transplantation
Keratitis
Graft Survival
Visual Acuity
Infection
Corneal Perforation
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Transplants
Corneal Ulcer
Penetrating Keratoplasty
Staphylococcus epidermidis
Hypesthesia
Candida albicans
Sutures
Fingers
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Hospitalization
Emergencies
Light
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Late Bacterial and Fungal Keratitis after Corneal Transplantation : Spectrum of Pathogens, Graft Survival, and Visual Prognosis. / Harris, David; Stulting, R. Doyle; Waring, George O.; Wilson, Louis A.

In: Ophthalmology, Vol. 95, No. 10, 01.01.1988, p. 1450-1457.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harris, David ; Stulting, R. Doyle ; Waring, George O. ; Wilson, Louis A. / Late Bacterial and Fungal Keratitis after Corneal Transplantation : Spectrum of Pathogens, Graft Survival, and Visual Prognosis. In: Ophthalmology. 1988 ; Vol. 95, No. 10. pp. 1450-1457.
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