Lay health educators translate a weight-loss intervention in senior centers

A randomized controlled trial

Delia Smith West, Zoran Bursac, Carol E. Cornell, Holly C. Felix, Jennifer K. Fausett, Rebecca Krukowski, Shelly Lensing, Sharhonda J. Love, T. Elaine Prewitt, Cornelia Beck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Older adults have high obesity rates and respond well to evidence-based weight-loss programs, such as the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) Lifestyle intervention. The goal of this study was to determine whether a translation of the DPP Lifestyle program delivered by lay health educators and conducted in senior centers is effective in promoting weight loss among older adults. Design: An RCT with older adults nested within senior centers. Senior centers identified lay health educators to receive training and deliver the intervention program at the senior center. Senior centers were randomized to DPP Lifestyle program or an attention control intervention (cognitive training). Setting/participants: Senior centers (N=15) located throughout Arkansas. Participants (N=228) were obese (BMI=34.5±4.9) older (aged 71.2±6.6 years) adults able to engage in moderate exercise. Follow-up data were collected at 4 months on 93% of the original cohort between February 2009 and July 2010. Interventions: A 12-session translation of the Diabetes Prevention Program Lifestyle behavioral weight-control program delivered in group sessions by trained lay health educators. Main outcome measures: Body weight was assessed by digital scale. Percentage weight loss from baseline and proportion achieving <5% and <7% weight loss were examined. Analyses were completed in March 2011. Results: Participants attending senior centers randomized to Lifestyle lost a significantly greater percentage of baseline weight (3.8%, 95% CI=2.9%, 4.6%) than those in the control senior centers (0.2%, 95% CI= 0.6%, 0.9%) after adjusting for baseline BMI and gender (p<0.001). Among participants attending senior centers offering the Lifestyle program, 38% lost <5% of baseline weight compared with 5% in the control arm (p<0.001). Similarly, significantly more participants (24%) in Lifestyle senior centers lost <7% than did control participants (3%, p=0.001). Conclusions: A behavioral lifestyle weight-loss intervention delivered by a lay health educator offers a promising vehicle for translation of evidence-based obesity treatment programs in underserved areas. Trial registration: This study is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01377506.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)385-391
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2011

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Senior Centers
Health Educators
Weight Loss
Randomized Controlled Trials
Life Style
Weights and Measures
Obesity
Weight Reduction Programs
compound A 12

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Lay health educators translate a weight-loss intervention in senior centers : A randomized controlled trial. / West, Delia Smith; Bursac, Zoran; Cornell, Carol E.; Felix, Holly C.; Fausett, Jennifer K.; Krukowski, Rebecca; Lensing, Shelly; Love, Sharhonda J.; Prewitt, T. Elaine; Beck, Cornelia.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 41, No. 4, 01.10.2011, p. 385-391.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

West, Delia Smith ; Bursac, Zoran ; Cornell, Carol E. ; Felix, Holly C. ; Fausett, Jennifer K. ; Krukowski, Rebecca ; Lensing, Shelly ; Love, Sharhonda J. ; Prewitt, T. Elaine ; Beck, Cornelia. / Lay health educators translate a weight-loss intervention in senior centers : A randomized controlled trial. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 41, No. 4. pp. 385-391.
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