Lead content of blood transfusions for extremely low-birth-weight infants

Mohamad Elabiad, Rebecca E. Hook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective Our objective was to evaluate the levels of lead in blood transfusions for extremely low-birth-weight (ELBW) infants and how they compare with lead levels suspected of causing neurotoxicity. Study Design This prospective cohort included infants with a birth weight ≤ 1000 g. The quantity of transfused lead was calculated based on transfused volume and packed red blood cell (PRBC) unit lead levels. The results were compared with the exposure reference. Results Thirty-seven infants (birth weight 736 ± 157 g, gestational age 25.5 ± 1.5 weeks) received 322 transfusions from 47 PRBC units with 6.5 ± 3.5 different units used to complete all transfusions per infant. Lead was detected in all units. The average lead level in a PRBC unit was 18.3 ± 10.4 μg/L. Of 322 transfusions, 139 (43%) had lead volumes that exceeded the exposure reference. All infants received at least one transfusion with a lead volume exceeding the daily reference dose equivalent, and four infants (11%) received several transfusions with a cumulative lead volume exceeding the weekly reference dose. Conclusion Blood transfusions are a potential source of lead for ELBW infants with unknown safety implications in this critical time of brain development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)765-770
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Perinatology
Volume30
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 17 2013

Fingerprint

Extremely Low Birth Weight Infant
Blood Transfusion
Erythrocytes
Birth Weight
Lead
Gestational Age
Safety

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Lead content of blood transfusions for extremely low-birth-weight infants. / Elabiad, Mohamad; Hook, Rebecca E.

In: American Journal of Perinatology, Vol. 30, No. 9, 17.01.2013, p. 765-770.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Objective Our objective was to evaluate the levels of lead in blood transfusions for extremely low-birth-weight (ELBW) infants and how they compare with lead levels suspected of causing neurotoxicity. Study Design This prospective cohort included infants with a birth weight ≤ 1000 g. The quantity of transfused lead was calculated based on transfused volume and packed red blood cell (PRBC) unit lead levels. The results were compared with the exposure reference. Results Thirty-seven infants (birth weight 736 ± 157 g, gestational age 25.5 ± 1.5 weeks) received 322 transfusions from 47 PRBC units with 6.5 ± 3.5 different units used to complete all transfusions per infant. Lead was detected in all units. The average lead level in a PRBC unit was 18.3 ± 10.4 μg/L. Of 322 transfusions, 139 (43%) had lead volumes that exceeded the exposure reference. All infants received at least one transfusion with a lead volume exceeding the daily reference dose equivalent, and four infants (11%) received several transfusions with a cumulative lead volume exceeding the weekly reference dose. Conclusion Blood transfusions are a potential source of lead for ELBW infants with unknown safety implications in this critical time of brain development.

AB - Objective Our objective was to evaluate the levels of lead in blood transfusions for extremely low-birth-weight (ELBW) infants and how they compare with lead levels suspected of causing neurotoxicity. Study Design This prospective cohort included infants with a birth weight ≤ 1000 g. The quantity of transfused lead was calculated based on transfused volume and packed red blood cell (PRBC) unit lead levels. The results were compared with the exposure reference. Results Thirty-seven infants (birth weight 736 ± 157 g, gestational age 25.5 ± 1.5 weeks) received 322 transfusions from 47 PRBC units with 6.5 ± 3.5 different units used to complete all transfusions per infant. Lead was detected in all units. The average lead level in a PRBC unit was 18.3 ± 10.4 μg/L. Of 322 transfusions, 139 (43%) had lead volumes that exceeded the exposure reference. All infants received at least one transfusion with a lead volume exceeding the daily reference dose equivalent, and four infants (11%) received several transfusions with a cumulative lead volume exceeding the weekly reference dose. Conclusion Blood transfusions are a potential source of lead for ELBW infants with unknown safety implications in this critical time of brain development.

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