Left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy associated with epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy and PLEC1 mutation

Chet R. Villa, Thomas D. Ryan, James J. Collins, Michael D. Taylor, Anne W. Lucky, John Jefferies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plectin mutations have been reported in epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy. We report the first case of left ventricular non-compaction in an 18-year-old male with epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy. The patient was diagnosed with epidermolysis bullosa simplex after blistering was noted at birth. Motor function difficulties were first recognized at age 11, however the patient was lost to follow up. He was re-evaluated at age 17 and demonstrated significant ptosis, ophthalmoparesis, and pharyngeal muscle weakness. He had predominant proximal muscle weakness with the inability to raise arms against gravity. He was ambulatory for short distances but lost the ability to rise from the floor at 14 years. He was subsequently diagnosed with epidermyolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy and a PLEC1 mutation. Screening cardiovascular imaging revealed a diagnosis of isolated left ventricular non-compaction. This case highlights the potential for delayed onset muscular dystrophy in patients with epidermolysis bullosa simplex. Furthermore, this case also underscores the importance of long term, routine cardiac evaluation, including imaging and electrophysiologic evaluation, in patients with epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy as the cardiac phenotype appears to parallel the variable severity and age of onset that characterize the neuromuscular phenotype.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)165-168
Number of pages4
JournalNeuromuscular Disorders
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Cardiomyopathies
Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex
Mutation
Muscular Dystrophies
Muscle Weakness
Plectin
Pharyngeal Muscles
Phenotype
Ophthalmoplegia
Lost to Follow-Up
Gravitation
Age of Onset
Parturition
Epidermolysa bullosa simplex and limb girdle muscular dystrophy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy associated with epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy and PLEC1 mutation. / Villa, Chet R.; Ryan, Thomas D.; Collins, James J.; Taylor, Michael D.; Lucky, Anne W.; Jefferies, John.

In: Neuromuscular Disorders, Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.01.2015, p. 165-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Villa, Chet R. ; Ryan, Thomas D. ; Collins, James J. ; Taylor, Michael D. ; Lucky, Anne W. ; Jefferies, John. / Left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy associated with epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy and PLEC1 mutation. In: Neuromuscular Disorders. 2015 ; Vol. 25, No. 2. pp. 165-168.
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