Length of stay, admission types, psychiatric diagnoses, and the implications of stigma in African Americans in the nationwide inpatient sample

Lois Bolden, Mona Wicks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

African Americans purportedly have a higher prevalence of mental illnesses but are often misdiagnosed and less likely to seek treatment. Delayed treatment has been associated with the stigma related to these disorders. The demographic characteristics, length of stay, most prevalent psychiatric diagnoses, and hospital admissions of African Americans were compared to other U.S. populations using a nationwide sample (N = 4,474,732). African American participants were younger, had significantly longer lengths of stay, and were admitted more often through the emergency room than the other groups in this sample. Psychosis, alcohol/drug dependence, and depressive neurosis were the most prevalent psychiatric diagnoses reported for African American participants. Research is needed to explain these results so that strategies can be instituted to improve the poor mental health outcomes often observed in African American populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1043-1059
Number of pages17
JournalIssues in Mental Health Nursing
Volume26
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

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Mental Disorders
African Americans
Inpatients
Length of Stay
Psychiatric Hospitals
Depressive Disorder
Diagnostic Errors
Psychotic Disorders
Population
Alcoholism
Substance-Related Disorders
Hospital Emergency Service
Mental Health
Demography
Therapeutics
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Phychiatric Mental Health

Cite this

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