Lessons learned: Experiences of gaining weight by kidney transplant recipients

Ansley Stanfill, Robin Bloodworth, Ann Cashion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context-Weight gain after kidney transplantation is a widespread phenomenon, but the question of effective strategies to intervene in patterns that lead to weight gain has not been well studied.Objective-To obtain (1) insight into recipients' perceptions of weight gain and (2) information on intervention strategies that recipients think could prevent weight gain.Design-Qualitative focus groups and a 13-question, multiple-choice survey were used.Setting-A regional mid-South transplant center.Participants-Seven kidney transplant recipients (86% African American, 57% female, mean age 55.0 years) who had gained at least 12% of their total body weight during a 12-month larger observational study.Main Outcome Measures-Content from the focus group sessions was analyzed for major and minor themes. The survey results were analyzed with descriptive statistics.Results-Identified themes included barriers to healthy eating caused by medications and removal of dietary restrictions. Barriers to physical activity included fear of injuring the new organ and health problems both related and unrelated to transplant. Perceived effects of weight gain included hypertension, diabetes, and embarrassment and concern at the rapid weight gain. Recipients would like an early start to implementation of lifestyle changes. Useful ideas included written materials regarding appropriate physical activities and dietary information, healthy cooking classes, and support groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-78
Number of pages8
JournalProgress in Transplantation
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

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Weight Gain
Kidney
Weights and Measures
Focus Groups
Exercise
Transplants
Self-Help Groups
Cooking
African Americans
Kidney Transplantation
Fear
Observational Studies
Transplant Recipients
Life Style
Body Weight
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Hypertension
Health
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Transplantation

Cite this

Lessons learned : Experiences of gaining weight by kidney transplant recipients. / Stanfill, Ansley; Bloodworth, Robin; Cashion, Ann.

In: Progress in Transplantation, Vol. 22, No. 1, 01.03.2012, p. 71-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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