Levels of word processing and incidental memory

Dissociable mechanisms in the temporal lobe

Eduardo M. Castillo, Panagiotis G. Simos, Robert N. Davis, Joshua Breier, Michele E. Fitzgerald, Andrew C. Papanicolaou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Word recall is facilitated when deep (e.g. semantic) processing is applied during encoding. This fact raises the question of the existence of specific brain mechanisms supporting different levels of information processing that can modulate incidental memory performance. In this study we obtained spatiotemporal brain activation profiles, using magnetic source imaging, from 10 adult volunteers as they performed a shallow (phonological) processing task and a deep (semantic) processing task. When phonological analysis of the word stimuli into their constituent phonemes was required, activation was largely restricted to the posterior portion of the left superior temporal gyrus (area 22). Conversely, when access to lexical/semantic representations was required, activation was found predominantly in the left middle temporal gyrus and medial temporal cortex. The differential engagement of each mechanism during word encoding was associated with dramatic changes in subsequent incidental memory performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3561-3566
Number of pages6
JournalNeuroReport
Volume12
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 16 2001

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Word Processing
Temporal Lobe
Semantics
Brain
Automatic Data Processing
Volunteers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Castillo, E. M., Simos, P. G., Davis, R. N., Breier, J., Fitzgerald, M. E., & Papanicolaou, A. C. (2001). Levels of word processing and incidental memory: Dissociable mechanisms in the temporal lobe. NeuroReport, 12(16), 3561-3566. https://doi.org/10.1097/00001756-200111160-00038

Levels of word processing and incidental memory : Dissociable mechanisms in the temporal lobe. / Castillo, Eduardo M.; Simos, Panagiotis G.; Davis, Robert N.; Breier, Joshua; Fitzgerald, Michele E.; Papanicolaou, Andrew C.

In: NeuroReport, Vol. 12, No. 16, 16.11.2001, p. 3561-3566.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Castillo, EM, Simos, PG, Davis, RN, Breier, J, Fitzgerald, ME & Papanicolaou, AC 2001, 'Levels of word processing and incidental memory: Dissociable mechanisms in the temporal lobe', NeuroReport, vol. 12, no. 16, pp. 3561-3566. https://doi.org/10.1097/00001756-200111160-00038
Castillo EM, Simos PG, Davis RN, Breier J, Fitzgerald ME, Papanicolaou AC. Levels of word processing and incidental memory: Dissociable mechanisms in the temporal lobe. NeuroReport. 2001 Nov 16;12(16):3561-3566. https://doi.org/10.1097/00001756-200111160-00038
Castillo, Eduardo M. ; Simos, Panagiotis G. ; Davis, Robert N. ; Breier, Joshua ; Fitzgerald, Michele E. ; Papanicolaou, Andrew C. / Levels of word processing and incidental memory : Dissociable mechanisms in the temporal lobe. In: NeuroReport. 2001 ; Vol. 12, No. 16. pp. 3561-3566.
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