Levetiracetam in the treatment of childhood epilepsy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Epilepsy is a common pediatric neurologic disorder that is difficult to manage in a substantial portion of children. Levetiracetam (LEV) is a novel antiepileptic drug (AED) that has recently been approved as add-on treatment for various seizure types in epilepsy populations that include children: for refractory partial seizures in epilepsy patients ≥ 4 years old, for myoclonic seizures in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy patients ≥ 12 years old, and for primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy patients (≥6 years old with FDA approval; ≥ 12 years old with EMEA approval). A review of published pediatric studies indicates that the efficacy of LEV is best established for partial seizures; however, results from recent double-blind and open-label trials indicate that adjunctive LEV also controls generalized seizures - particularly myoclonic and generalized tonic-clonic - in children and adolescents with primary generalized epilepsy. LEV was well-tolerated in pediatric studies. The most common adverse events (AEs) reported were sedation related. Behavioral AEs were among the most commonly reported events in some trials; conversely, improvements in behavior and cognition were also frequently reported. LEV appears to be a safe and effective AED with unique characteristics that benefit the treatment of children with epilepsy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)409-421
Number of pages13
JournalNeuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
Volume3
Issue number4
StatePublished - Nov 6 2007

Fingerprint

etiracetam
Epilepsy
Seizures
Pediatrics
Anticonvulsants
Therapeutics
Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy
Generalized Epilepsy
Nervous System Diseases
Cognition

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Levetiracetam in the treatment of childhood epilepsy. / Wheless, James.

In: Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, Vol. 3, No. 4, 06.11.2007, p. 409-421.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{1d7c93de6164449a9d8bde08b39ad2b8,
title = "Levetiracetam in the treatment of childhood epilepsy",
abstract = "Epilepsy is a common pediatric neurologic disorder that is difficult to manage in a substantial portion of children. Levetiracetam (LEV) is a novel antiepileptic drug (AED) that has recently been approved as add-on treatment for various seizure types in epilepsy populations that include children: for refractory partial seizures in epilepsy patients ≥ 4 years old, for myoclonic seizures in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy patients ≥ 12 years old, and for primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy patients (≥6 years old with FDA approval; ≥ 12 years old with EMEA approval). A review of published pediatric studies indicates that the efficacy of LEV is best established for partial seizures; however, results from recent double-blind and open-label trials indicate that adjunctive LEV also controls generalized seizures - particularly myoclonic and generalized tonic-clonic - in children and adolescents with primary generalized epilepsy. LEV was well-tolerated in pediatric studies. The most common adverse events (AEs) reported were sedation related. Behavioral AEs were among the most commonly reported events in some trials; conversely, improvements in behavior and cognition were also frequently reported. LEV appears to be a safe and effective AED with unique characteristics that benefit the treatment of children with epilepsy.",
author = "James Wheless",
year = "2007",
month = "11",
day = "6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "3",
pages = "409--421",
journal = "Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment",
issn = "1176-6328",
publisher = "Dove Medical Press Ltd.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Levetiracetam in the treatment of childhood epilepsy

AU - Wheless, James

PY - 2007/11/6

Y1 - 2007/11/6

N2 - Epilepsy is a common pediatric neurologic disorder that is difficult to manage in a substantial portion of children. Levetiracetam (LEV) is a novel antiepileptic drug (AED) that has recently been approved as add-on treatment for various seizure types in epilepsy populations that include children: for refractory partial seizures in epilepsy patients ≥ 4 years old, for myoclonic seizures in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy patients ≥ 12 years old, and for primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy patients (≥6 years old with FDA approval; ≥ 12 years old with EMEA approval). A review of published pediatric studies indicates that the efficacy of LEV is best established for partial seizures; however, results from recent double-blind and open-label trials indicate that adjunctive LEV also controls generalized seizures - particularly myoclonic and generalized tonic-clonic - in children and adolescents with primary generalized epilepsy. LEV was well-tolerated in pediatric studies. The most common adverse events (AEs) reported were sedation related. Behavioral AEs were among the most commonly reported events in some trials; conversely, improvements in behavior and cognition were also frequently reported. LEV appears to be a safe and effective AED with unique characteristics that benefit the treatment of children with epilepsy.

AB - Epilepsy is a common pediatric neurologic disorder that is difficult to manage in a substantial portion of children. Levetiracetam (LEV) is a novel antiepileptic drug (AED) that has recently been approved as add-on treatment for various seizure types in epilepsy populations that include children: for refractory partial seizures in epilepsy patients ≥ 4 years old, for myoclonic seizures in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy patients ≥ 12 years old, and for primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy patients (≥6 years old with FDA approval; ≥ 12 years old with EMEA approval). A review of published pediatric studies indicates that the efficacy of LEV is best established for partial seizures; however, results from recent double-blind and open-label trials indicate that adjunctive LEV also controls generalized seizures - particularly myoclonic and generalized tonic-clonic - in children and adolescents with primary generalized epilepsy. LEV was well-tolerated in pediatric studies. The most common adverse events (AEs) reported were sedation related. Behavioral AEs were among the most commonly reported events in some trials; conversely, improvements in behavior and cognition were also frequently reported. LEV appears to be a safe and effective AED with unique characteristics that benefit the treatment of children with epilepsy.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=35648976607&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=35648976607&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Review article

C2 - 19300570

AN - SCOPUS:35648976607

VL - 3

SP - 409

EP - 421

JO - Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment

JF - Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment

SN - 1176-6328

IS - 4

ER -