Library instruction in the medical school curriculum

A survey of medical college libraries

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Future physicians must learn to cope with continuing changes in access to medical information. New instructional techniques, such as problem-based learning, emphasize the importance of research skills to medical students. To investigate the feasibility of establishing library instruction as a required part of the East Tennessee State University College of Medicine curriculum for undergraduates, the university's medical library surveyed 123 medical school libraries to determine the level of instruction offered by other academic medical libraries. The survey asked whether formal instruction was offered or required, and which courses were taught at each level of undergraduate training. Analysis of the fifty-five responses revealed that 75% offered formal library instruction, and that 49% of these respondents (36% of the total sample) required all students to take such courses. The courses offered most often were library tours, online catalog instruction, and MEDLINE-on-CD-ROM classes. Overall, thirty-three different course titles were offered by responding libraries. The majority of classes involved second- and third-year students. The survey responses reveal the prevalence of required library instruction in medical school curricula, and a broad- scale commitment to the development of lifelong learning skills among future health professionals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-195
Number of pages5
JournalBulletin of the Medical Library Association
Volume84
Issue number2
StatePublished - Apr 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Medical Libraries
Medical Schools
Curriculum
Libraries
instruction
curriculum
school
CD-ROM
Students
Access to Information
Problem-Based Learning
Medical Students
MEDLINE
Medicine
Surveys and Questionnaires
Learning
Physicians
lifelong learning
health professionals
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Library instruction in the medical school curriculum : A survey of medical college libraries. / Earl, Martha.

In: Bulletin of the Medical Library Association, Vol. 84, No. 2, 01.04.1996, p. 191-195.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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