Lifestyle and metabolic syndrome in adult survivors of childhood cancer: A report from the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study

Webb Smith, Chenghong Li, Kerri A. Nottage, Daniel A. Mulrooney, Gregory Armstrong, Jennifer Q. Lanctot, Wassim Chemaitilly, Joseph H. Laver, Deo Kumar Srivastava, Leslie L. Robison, Melissa M. Hudson, Kirsten K. Ness

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54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) are at an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MetSyn), which may be reduced with lifestyle modifications. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize lifestyle habits and associations with MetSyn among CCS. METHODS CCS who were ≥ 10 years from diagnosis, aged > 18 years, and participating in the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study completed medical and laboratory tests and a food frequency questionnaire. The Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel criteria were used to classify participants with MetSyn. Anthropometric, food frequency questionnaire, and self-reported physical activity data were used to characterize lifestyle habits according to World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) recommendations. Those who met ≥ 4 of 7 recommendations were classified as having followed guidelines. Sex-stratified log-binomial regression models were used to evaluate associations between dietary/lifestyle habits and MetSyn, adjusted for age, age at cancer diagnosis, receipt of cranial radiotherapy, education, and household income. RESULTS Among 1598 CCS (49.2% of whom were male, with a median age of 32.7 years [range, 18.9 years-60.0 years]), 31.8% met criteria for MetSyn and 27.0% followed WCRF/AICR guidelines. Females who did not follow WCRF/AICR guidelines were 2.4 times (95% confidence interval, 1.7-3.3) and males were 2.2 times (95% confidence interval, 1.6-3.0) more likely to have MetSyn than those who followed WCRF/AICR guidelines. CONCLUSIONS Adherence to a heart-healthy lifestyle is associated with a lower risk of MetSyn among CCS. There is a need to determine whether lifestyle interventions prevent or remediate MetSyn in CCS. Cancer 2014;120:2742-2750.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2742-2750
Number of pages9
JournalCancer
Volume120
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2014

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Survivors
Life Style
Cohort Studies
Neoplasms
Guidelines
Research
Habits
Confidence Intervals
Education
Food
Statistical Models
Feeding Behavior
Radiotherapy
Cholesterol
Exercise

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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Lifestyle and metabolic syndrome in adult survivors of childhood cancer : A report from the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study. / Smith, Webb; Li, Chenghong; Nottage, Kerri A.; Mulrooney, Daniel A.; Armstrong, Gregory; Lanctot, Jennifer Q.; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Laver, Joseph H.; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Robison, Leslie L.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Ness, Kirsten K.

In: Cancer, Vol. 120, No. 17, 01.09.2014, p. 2742-2750.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, W, Li, C, Nottage, KA, Mulrooney, DA, Armstrong, G, Lanctot, JQ, Chemaitilly, W, Laver, JH, Srivastava, DK, Robison, LL, Hudson, MM & Ness, KK 2014, 'Lifestyle and metabolic syndrome in adult survivors of childhood cancer: A report from the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study', Cancer, vol. 120, no. 17, pp. 2742-2750. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.28670
Smith, Webb ; Li, Chenghong ; Nottage, Kerri A. ; Mulrooney, Daniel A. ; Armstrong, Gregory ; Lanctot, Jennifer Q. ; Chemaitilly, Wassim ; Laver, Joseph H. ; Srivastava, Deo Kumar ; Robison, Leslie L. ; Hudson, Melissa M. ; Ness, Kirsten K. / Lifestyle and metabolic syndrome in adult survivors of childhood cancer : A report from the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study. In: Cancer. 2014 ; Vol. 120, No. 17. pp. 2742-2750.
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title = "Lifestyle and metabolic syndrome in adult survivors of childhood cancer: A report from the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) are at an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MetSyn), which may be reduced with lifestyle modifications. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize lifestyle habits and associations with MetSyn among CCS. METHODS CCS who were ≥ 10 years from diagnosis, aged > 18 years, and participating in the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study completed medical and laboratory tests and a food frequency questionnaire. The Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel criteria were used to classify participants with MetSyn. Anthropometric, food frequency questionnaire, and self-reported physical activity data were used to characterize lifestyle habits according to World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) recommendations. Those who met ≥ 4 of 7 recommendations were classified as having followed guidelines. Sex-stratified log-binomial regression models were used to evaluate associations between dietary/lifestyle habits and MetSyn, adjusted for age, age at cancer diagnosis, receipt of cranial radiotherapy, education, and household income. RESULTS Among 1598 CCS (49.2{\%} of whom were male, with a median age of 32.7 years [range, 18.9 years-60.0 years]), 31.8{\%} met criteria for MetSyn and 27.0{\%} followed WCRF/AICR guidelines. Females who did not follow WCRF/AICR guidelines were 2.4 times (95{\%} confidence interval, 1.7-3.3) and males were 2.2 times (95{\%} confidence interval, 1.6-3.0) more likely to have MetSyn than those who followed WCRF/AICR guidelines. CONCLUSIONS Adherence to a heart-healthy lifestyle is associated with a lower risk of MetSyn among CCS. There is a need to determine whether lifestyle interventions prevent or remediate MetSyn in CCS. Cancer 2014;120:2742-2750.",
author = "Webb Smith and Chenghong Li and Nottage, {Kerri A.} and Mulrooney, {Daniel A.} and Gregory Armstrong and Lanctot, {Jennifer Q.} and Wassim Chemaitilly and Laver, {Joseph H.} and Srivastava, {Deo Kumar} and Robison, {Leslie L.} and Hudson, {Melissa M.} and Ness, {Kirsten K.}",
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T1 - Lifestyle and metabolic syndrome in adult survivors of childhood cancer

T2 - A report from the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study

AU - Smith, Webb

AU - Li, Chenghong

AU - Nottage, Kerri A.

AU - Mulrooney, Daniel A.

AU - Armstrong, Gregory

AU - Lanctot, Jennifer Q.

AU - Chemaitilly, Wassim

AU - Laver, Joseph H.

AU - Srivastava, Deo Kumar

AU - Robison, Leslie L.

AU - Hudson, Melissa M.

AU - Ness, Kirsten K.

PY - 2014/9/1

Y1 - 2014/9/1

N2 - BACKGROUND Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) are at an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MetSyn), which may be reduced with lifestyle modifications. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize lifestyle habits and associations with MetSyn among CCS. METHODS CCS who were ≥ 10 years from diagnosis, aged > 18 years, and participating in the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study completed medical and laboratory tests and a food frequency questionnaire. The Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel criteria were used to classify participants with MetSyn. Anthropometric, food frequency questionnaire, and self-reported physical activity data were used to characterize lifestyle habits according to World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) recommendations. Those who met ≥ 4 of 7 recommendations were classified as having followed guidelines. Sex-stratified log-binomial regression models were used to evaluate associations between dietary/lifestyle habits and MetSyn, adjusted for age, age at cancer diagnosis, receipt of cranial radiotherapy, education, and household income. RESULTS Among 1598 CCS (49.2% of whom were male, with a median age of 32.7 years [range, 18.9 years-60.0 years]), 31.8% met criteria for MetSyn and 27.0% followed WCRF/AICR guidelines. Females who did not follow WCRF/AICR guidelines were 2.4 times (95% confidence interval, 1.7-3.3) and males were 2.2 times (95% confidence interval, 1.6-3.0) more likely to have MetSyn than those who followed WCRF/AICR guidelines. CONCLUSIONS Adherence to a heart-healthy lifestyle is associated with a lower risk of MetSyn among CCS. There is a need to determine whether lifestyle interventions prevent or remediate MetSyn in CCS. Cancer 2014;120:2742-2750.

AB - BACKGROUND Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) are at an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MetSyn), which may be reduced with lifestyle modifications. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize lifestyle habits and associations with MetSyn among CCS. METHODS CCS who were ≥ 10 years from diagnosis, aged > 18 years, and participating in the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study completed medical and laboratory tests and a food frequency questionnaire. The Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel criteria were used to classify participants with MetSyn. Anthropometric, food frequency questionnaire, and self-reported physical activity data were used to characterize lifestyle habits according to World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) recommendations. Those who met ≥ 4 of 7 recommendations were classified as having followed guidelines. Sex-stratified log-binomial regression models were used to evaluate associations between dietary/lifestyle habits and MetSyn, adjusted for age, age at cancer diagnosis, receipt of cranial radiotherapy, education, and household income. RESULTS Among 1598 CCS (49.2% of whom were male, with a median age of 32.7 years [range, 18.9 years-60.0 years]), 31.8% met criteria for MetSyn and 27.0% followed WCRF/AICR guidelines. Females who did not follow WCRF/AICR guidelines were 2.4 times (95% confidence interval, 1.7-3.3) and males were 2.2 times (95% confidence interval, 1.6-3.0) more likely to have MetSyn than those who followed WCRF/AICR guidelines. CONCLUSIONS Adherence to a heart-healthy lifestyle is associated with a lower risk of MetSyn among CCS. There is a need to determine whether lifestyle interventions prevent or remediate MetSyn in CCS. Cancer 2014;120:2742-2750.

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