Limb ischemia

Surgical therapy in acute arterial occlusion

Daniel F. Neuzil, William H. Edwards, Joseph L. Mulherin, Raymond S. Martin, Roger Bonau, Steven J. Eskind, Thomas C. Naslund, William H. Edwards

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    18 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Mortality and amputation rates from acute arterial occlusion are reported from 7 to 37 per cent and 10 to 30 per cent, respectively. Recent data from thrombolysis or peripheral arterial surgery suggest no significant differences between initial management with surgical or thrombolytic therapy. Mortality and amputation rates were in the above ranges. The last 230 procedures (216 patients) over 10 years were reviewed. All graft occlusions, cardiac catheterization injuries, and aortic balloon-related thromboses were excluded. Immediate and delayed amputation rates were 6.5 and 0.9 per cent. Death occurred in 21 patients (9.7%), with only 6 deaths over the last 6 years (3.8%). Except for transesophageal echocardiography, perioperative studies were of limited value. Long-term anticoagulation was also not effective in preventing recurrent episodes. A mortality rate of 9.7 per cent and amputation rate of 7.4 per cent justifies an early aggressive surgical approach. Limited perioperative studies and less prolonged anticoagulation may also improve cost containment.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)270-274
    Number of pages5
    JournalAmerican Surgeon
    Volume63
    Issue number3
    StatePublished - Apr 7 1997

    Fingerprint

    Amputation
    Ischemia
    Extremities
    Mortality
    Cost Control
    Thrombolytic Therapy
    Transesophageal Echocardiography
    Therapeutics
    Cardiac Catheterization
    Thrombosis
    Transplants
    Wounds and Injuries

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Surgery

    Cite this

    Neuzil, D. F., Edwards, W. H., Mulherin, J. L., Martin, R. S., Bonau, R., Eskind, S. J., ... Edwards, W. H. (1997). Limb ischemia: Surgical therapy in acute arterial occlusion. American Surgeon, 63(3), 270-274.

    Limb ischemia : Surgical therapy in acute arterial occlusion. / Neuzil, Daniel F.; Edwards, William H.; Mulherin, Joseph L.; Martin, Raymond S.; Bonau, Roger; Eskind, Steven J.; Naslund, Thomas C.; Edwards, William H.

    In: American Surgeon, Vol. 63, No. 3, 07.04.1997, p. 270-274.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Neuzil, DF, Edwards, WH, Mulherin, JL, Martin, RS, Bonau, R, Eskind, SJ, Naslund, TC & Edwards, WH 1997, 'Limb ischemia: Surgical therapy in acute arterial occlusion', American Surgeon, vol. 63, no. 3, pp. 270-274.
    Neuzil DF, Edwards WH, Mulherin JL, Martin RS, Bonau R, Eskind SJ et al. Limb ischemia: Surgical therapy in acute arterial occlusion. American Surgeon. 1997 Apr 7;63(3):270-274.
    Neuzil, Daniel F. ; Edwards, William H. ; Mulherin, Joseph L. ; Martin, Raymond S. ; Bonau, Roger ; Eskind, Steven J. ; Naslund, Thomas C. ; Edwards, William H. / Limb ischemia : Surgical therapy in acute arterial occlusion. In: American Surgeon. 1997 ; Vol. 63, No. 3. pp. 270-274.
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    AU - Bonau, Roger

    AU - Eskind, Steven J.

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