Linking cancer cachexia-induced anabolic resistance to skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism

Justin P. Hardee, Ryan N. Montalvo, James Carson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cancer cachexia, a wasting syndrome characterized by skeletal muscle depletion, contributes to increased patient morbidity and mortality. While the intricate balance between protein synthesis and breakdown regulates skeletal muscle mass, the suppression of basal protein synthesis may not account for the severe wasting induced by cancer. Therefore, recent research has shifted to the regulation of "anabolic resistance," which is the impaired ability of nutrition and exercise to stimulate protein synthesis. Emerging evidence suggests that oxidative metabolism can regulate both basal and induced muscle protein synthesis. While disrupted protein turnover and oxidative metabolism in cachectic muscle have been examined independently, evidence suggests a linkage between these processes for the regulation of cancer-induced wasting. The primary objective of this review is to highlight the connection between dysfunctional oxidative metabolism and cancer-induced anabolic resistance in skeletal muscle. First, we review oxidative metabolism regulation of muscle protein synthesis. Second, we describe cancer-induced alterations in the response to an anabolic stimulus. Finally, we review a role for exercise to inhibit cancer-induced anabolic suppression and mitochondrial dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number8018197
JournalOxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume2017
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Cachexia
Metabolism
Muscle
Skeletal Muscle
Muscle Proteins
Neoplasms
Proteins
Exercise
Wasting Syndrome
Second Primary Neoplasms
Nutrition
Morbidity
Muscles
Mortality
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Aging
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Linking cancer cachexia-induced anabolic resistance to skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism. / Hardee, Justin P.; Montalvo, Ryan N.; Carson, James.

In: Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, Vol. 2017, 8018197, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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