Lipids in aging and chronic illness

Impact on survival

Csaba Kovesdy, Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hypercholesterolemia has been implicated as a risk factor for atherosclerosis by numerous observational studies in the general population. Observational studies in patients suffering from various chronic illnesses and in individuals with advanced age have indicated an inverse association between cholesterol level and mortality, suggesting that the classical Framingham paradigm may not apply to these groups. It is yet unclear what the reasons for these paradoxically inverse associations are. We present a summary of the descriptive studies that have examined the association between cholesterol levels and outcomes in a variety of patient groups. The various possible mechanisms behind the observed "lipid paradox" and the potential implications of reverse epidemiology of hypercholesterolemia in clinical medicine and public health are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalArchives of Medical Science
Volume3
Issue number4 SUPPL. A
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

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Hypercholesterolemia
Observational Studies
Chronic Disease
Cholesterol
Lipids
Survival
Clinical Medicine
Atherosclerosis
Epidemiology
Public Health
Mortality
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Lipids in aging and chronic illness : Impact on survival. / Kovesdy, Csaba; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar.

In: Archives of Medical Science, Vol. 3, No. 4 SUPPL. A, 01.12.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Kovesdy, Csaba ; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar. / Lipids in aging and chronic illness : Impact on survival. In: Archives of Medical Science. 2007 ; Vol. 3, No. 4 SUPPL. A.
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