Lipoteichoic acid and M protein: dual adhesins of group A streptococci

Harry Courtney, Christina Von Hunolstein, James Dale, Michael S. Bronze, Edwin H. Beachey, David L. Hasty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The roles of lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and M protein in the adherence of group A streptococci to human cells were investigated. Both M+ and M- streptococci bound to pharyngeal and buccal epithelial cells in similar numbers. Streptococcal attachment was inhibited by LTA, but not by the pepsin-extracted, amino-terminal half of M protein (pep M), suggesting that M protein does not mediate attachment to these cells. However, a purified, recombinant, intact M protein did block attachment of streptococci to buccal cells. Using synthetic peptides, the inhibitory domain was localized to a region of intact M protein that is within or near the bacterial cell wall. Evidence is presented to suggest that on the surface of streptococci this region of the M protein is probably not accessible for interactions with host cell receptors and that M protein does not mediate attachment to buccal or pharyngeal cells. In contrast, approximately 10-times more M+ streptococci bound to Hep-2 cells than did M- streptococci and pep M protein blocked binding of streptococci to Hep-2 cells. The data suggest that at least two Streptococcal adhesins, LTA and M protein, are involved in the adherence of streptococci to certain cells and that the relative contributions of these adhesins to the attachment process depends on the type of host cells used to study adherence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-208
Number of pages10
JournalMicrobial Pathogenesis
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

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Streptococcus
Proteins
Cheek
lipoteichoic acid
Pepsin A
Protein Binding
Cell Wall
Epithelial Cells

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Courtney, H., Von Hunolstein, C., Dale, J., Bronze, M. S., Beachey, E. H., & Hasty, D. L. (1992). Lipoteichoic acid and M protein: dual adhesins of group A streptococci. Microbial Pathogenesis, 12(3), 199-208. https://doi.org/10.1016/0882-4010(92)90054-R

Lipoteichoic acid and M protein : dual adhesins of group A streptococci. / Courtney, Harry; Von Hunolstein, Christina; Dale, James; Bronze, Michael S.; Beachey, Edwin H.; Hasty, David L.

In: Microbial Pathogenesis, Vol. 12, No. 3, 01.01.1992, p. 199-208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Courtney, H, Von Hunolstein, C, Dale, J, Bronze, MS, Beachey, EH & Hasty, DL 1992, 'Lipoteichoic acid and M protein: dual adhesins of group A streptococci', Microbial Pathogenesis, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 199-208. https://doi.org/10.1016/0882-4010(92)90054-R
Courtney, Harry ; Von Hunolstein, Christina ; Dale, James ; Bronze, Michael S. ; Beachey, Edwin H. ; Hasty, David L. / Lipoteichoic acid and M protein : dual adhesins of group A streptococci. In: Microbial Pathogenesis. 1992 ; Vol. 12, No. 3. pp. 199-208.
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