Live attenuated influenza vaccine enhances colonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus in mice

Michael J. Mina, Jonathan Mccullers, Keith P. Klugman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Community interactions at mucosal surfaces between viruses, like influenza virus, and respiratory bacterial pathogens are important contributors toward pathogenesis of bacterial disease. What has not been considered is the natural extension of these interactions to live attenuated immunizations, and in particular, live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs). Using a mouse-adapted LAIV against influenza A (H3N2) virus carrying the same mutations as the human FluMist vaccine, we find that LAIV vaccination reverses normal bacterial clearance from the nasopharynx and significantly increases bacterial carriage densities of the clinically important bacterial pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae (serotypes 19F and 7F) and Staphylococcus aureus (strains Newman and Wright) within the upper respiratory tract of mice. Vaccination with LAIV also resulted in 2- to 5-fold increases in mean durations of bacterial carriage. Furthermore, we show that the increases in carriage density and duration were nearly identical in all aspects to changes in bacterial colonizing dynamics following infection with wild-type (WT) influenza virus. Importantly, LAIV, unlike WT influenza viruses, had no effect on severe bacterial disease or mortality within the lower respiratory tract. Our findings are, to the best of our knowledge, the first to demonstrate that vaccination with a live attenuated viral vaccine can directly modulate colonizing dynamics of important and unrelated human bacterial pathogens, and does so in a manner highly analogous to that seen following wild-type virus infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere01040-13
JournalmBio
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 18 2014

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Attenuated Vaccines
Influenza Vaccines
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Staphylococcus aureus
Orthomyxoviridae
Vaccination
Respiratory System
Viral Vaccines
H3N2 Subtype Influenza A Virus
Nasopharynx
Influenza A virus
Virus Diseases
Immunization
Viruses
Mutation
Mortality
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Virology

Cite this

Live attenuated influenza vaccine enhances colonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus in mice. / Mina, Michael J.; Mccullers, Jonathan; Klugman, Keith P.

In: mBio, Vol. 5, No. 1, e01040-13, 18.02.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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