Live attenuated influenza virus increases pneumococcal translocation and persistence within the middle ear

Michael J. Mina, Keith P. Klugman, Jason W. Rosch, Jonathan Mccullers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Infection with influenza A virus (IAV) increases susceptibility to respiratory bacterial infections, resulting in increased bacterial carriage and complications such acute otitis media, pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis. Recently, vaccination with live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) was reported to enhance subclinical bacterial colonization within the nasopharynx, similar to IAV. Although LAIV does not predispose to bacterial pneumonia, whether it may alter bacterial transmigration toward the middle ear, where it could have clinically relevant implications, has not been investigated. Methods. BALB/c mice received LAIV or phosphate-buffered saline 1 or 7 days before or during pneumococcal colonization with either of 2 clinical isolates, 19F or 7F. Middle ear bacterial titers were monitored daily via in vivo imaging. Results. LAIV increased bacterial transmigration to and persistence within the middle ear. When colonization followed LAIV inoculation, a minimum LAIV incubation period of 4 days was required before bacterial transmigration commenced. Conclusions. While LAIV vaccination is safe and effective at reducing IAV and coinfection with influenza virus and bacteria, LAIV may increase bacterial transmigration to the middle ear and could thus increase the risk of clinically relevant acute otitis media. These data warrant further investigations into interactions between live attenuated viruses and naturally colonizing bacterial pathogens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)195-201
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume212
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Middle Ear
Orthomyxoviridae
Influenza A virus
Otitis Media
Vaccination
Bacterial Pneumonia
Nasopharynx
Bacteremia
Coinfection
Meningitis
Bacterial Infections
Respiratory Tract Infections
Pneumonia
Phosphates
Viruses
Bacteria
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Live attenuated influenza virus increases pneumococcal translocation and persistence within the middle ear. / Mina, Michael J.; Klugman, Keith P.; Rosch, Jason W.; Mccullers, Jonathan.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 212, No. 2, 15.07.2015, p. 195-201.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{45f8ab55b4e848e1afc0d1d9cca9f22e,
title = "Live attenuated influenza virus increases pneumococcal translocation and persistence within the middle ear",
abstract = "Background. Infection with influenza A virus (IAV) increases susceptibility to respiratory bacterial infections, resulting in increased bacterial carriage and complications such acute otitis media, pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis. Recently, vaccination with live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) was reported to enhance subclinical bacterial colonization within the nasopharynx, similar to IAV. Although LAIV does not predispose to bacterial pneumonia, whether it may alter bacterial transmigration toward the middle ear, where it could have clinically relevant implications, has not been investigated. Methods. BALB/c mice received LAIV or phosphate-buffered saline 1 or 7 days before or during pneumococcal colonization with either of 2 clinical isolates, 19F or 7F. Middle ear bacterial titers were monitored daily via in vivo imaging. Results. LAIV increased bacterial transmigration to and persistence within the middle ear. When colonization followed LAIV inoculation, a minimum LAIV incubation period of 4 days was required before bacterial transmigration commenced. Conclusions. While LAIV vaccination is safe and effective at reducing IAV and coinfection with influenza virus and bacteria, LAIV may increase bacterial transmigration to the middle ear and could thus increase the risk of clinically relevant acute otitis media. These data warrant further investigations into interactions between live attenuated viruses and naturally colonizing bacterial pathogens.",
author = "Mina, {Michael J.} and Klugman, {Keith P.} and Rosch, {Jason W.} and Jonathan Mccullers",
year = "2015",
month = "7",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1093/infdis/jiu804",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "212",
pages = "195--201",
journal = "Journal of Infectious Diseases",
issn = "0022-1899",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Live attenuated influenza virus increases pneumococcal translocation and persistence within the middle ear

AU - Mina, Michael J.

AU - Klugman, Keith P.

AU - Rosch, Jason W.

AU - Mccullers, Jonathan

PY - 2015/7/15

Y1 - 2015/7/15

N2 - Background. Infection with influenza A virus (IAV) increases susceptibility to respiratory bacterial infections, resulting in increased bacterial carriage and complications such acute otitis media, pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis. Recently, vaccination with live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) was reported to enhance subclinical bacterial colonization within the nasopharynx, similar to IAV. Although LAIV does not predispose to bacterial pneumonia, whether it may alter bacterial transmigration toward the middle ear, where it could have clinically relevant implications, has not been investigated. Methods. BALB/c mice received LAIV or phosphate-buffered saline 1 or 7 days before or during pneumococcal colonization with either of 2 clinical isolates, 19F or 7F. Middle ear bacterial titers were monitored daily via in vivo imaging. Results. LAIV increased bacterial transmigration to and persistence within the middle ear. When colonization followed LAIV inoculation, a minimum LAIV incubation period of 4 days was required before bacterial transmigration commenced. Conclusions. While LAIV vaccination is safe and effective at reducing IAV and coinfection with influenza virus and bacteria, LAIV may increase bacterial transmigration to the middle ear and could thus increase the risk of clinically relevant acute otitis media. These data warrant further investigations into interactions between live attenuated viruses and naturally colonizing bacterial pathogens.

AB - Background. Infection with influenza A virus (IAV) increases susceptibility to respiratory bacterial infections, resulting in increased bacterial carriage and complications such acute otitis media, pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis. Recently, vaccination with live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) was reported to enhance subclinical bacterial colonization within the nasopharynx, similar to IAV. Although LAIV does not predispose to bacterial pneumonia, whether it may alter bacterial transmigration toward the middle ear, where it could have clinically relevant implications, has not been investigated. Methods. BALB/c mice received LAIV or phosphate-buffered saline 1 or 7 days before or during pneumococcal colonization with either of 2 clinical isolates, 19F or 7F. Middle ear bacterial titers were monitored daily via in vivo imaging. Results. LAIV increased bacterial transmigration to and persistence within the middle ear. When colonization followed LAIV inoculation, a minimum LAIV incubation period of 4 days was required before bacterial transmigration commenced. Conclusions. While LAIV vaccination is safe and effective at reducing IAV and coinfection with influenza virus and bacteria, LAIV may increase bacterial transmigration to the middle ear and could thus increase the risk of clinically relevant acute otitis media. These data warrant further investigations into interactions between live attenuated viruses and naturally colonizing bacterial pathogens.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84936865644&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84936865644&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/infdis/jiu804

DO - 10.1093/infdis/jiu804

M3 - Article

VL - 212

SP - 195

EP - 201

JO - Journal of Infectious Diseases

JF - Journal of Infectious Diseases

SN - 0022-1899

IS - 2

ER -