Liver cancer

Evan Glazer, Steven A. Curley

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Primary malignancies of the liver typically include hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and biliary carcinoma (cholangiocarcinoma, CC). Although there are other primary cancers of the liver, such as hepatoblastoma, their rarity makes description and analysis of them difficult. An estimated 30,000 people in the USA developed liver cancer in 2008, and the incidence is increasing [1]. Nearly 20,000 people die of primary liver cancer each year [1]. Despite improved treatments for HCC, the overall 5-year survival rate in the USA for patients with this disease remains less than 10 % [2]. Furthermore, in the USA, the most rapid increase in cancer-related deaths among men has been seen in those with HCC [3]. The standard of care remains multimodality therapy, but very few patients are candidates for curative resection or liver transplantation [4]. Intra-arterial chemoembolization is one component of multidisciplinary therapy, but it does not usually offer a cure. Even sorafenib, the most recently approved systemic (oral) drug for treatment of HCC, increased median survival length by less than 3 months compared with controls, to a total of 10.7 months [5].

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication60 Years of Survival Outcomes at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages167-175
Number of pages9
ISBN (Electronic)9781461451976
ISBN (Print)1461451965, 9781461451969
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Liver Neoplasms
Cholangiocarcinoma
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Hepatoblastoma
Therapeutics
Standard of Care
Liver Transplantation
Neoplasms
Survival Rate
Survival
Liver
Incidence
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Glazer, E., & Curley, S. A. (2012). Liver cancer. In 60 Years of Survival Outcomes at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (pp. 167-175). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5197-6_16

Liver cancer. / Glazer, Evan; Curley, Steven A.

60 Years of Survival Outcomes at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Springer New York, 2012. p. 167-175.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Glazer, E & Curley, SA 2012, Liver cancer. in 60 Years of Survival Outcomes at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Springer New York, pp. 167-175. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5197-6_16
Glazer E, Curley SA. Liver cancer. In 60 Years of Survival Outcomes at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Springer New York. 2012. p. 167-175 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5197-6_16
Glazer, Evan ; Curley, Steven A. / Liver cancer. 60 Years of Survival Outcomes at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Springer New York, 2012. pp. 167-175
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